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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
Southern Historical Society Papers. Vol. XVIII. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1890. The battle of the Crater, July 30, 1864. An Address delivered before the A. P. Hill Camp of Confederate Veterans, of Petersburg, Va., in that city, on the 24th of June, 1890. by Comrade George S. Bernard. comrades: It was my fortune as a member of the Petersburg Riflemen, Company E, Twelfth Virginia Infantry, General William Mahone's brigade, to take part in the memorable engagement known as The Battle of the Crater, and it is now proposed to give some account of the action—to tell a war story from the standpoint of a high private in the rear rank, supplementing information within my personal knowledge with some material drawn from other sources believed to be reliable—this being necessary to a proper understanding of what will be told. On Saturday morning, the 30th of July, 1864, when the mine under the angle in the Confederate's works around Petersburg, known as Elliott's sailent,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
nse woods about five hundred yards farther to our right. This low, flat meadow stretched up to and swinging around Crew's house, extended as far Turkey Bend on James river. The enemy had drawn up his artillery (as well as could be ascertained, about fifty pieces) in a crescent-shaped line, the convex-line being next to our posite after the surrender, etc. In the account of the Unveiling of the Soldiers' Monument in Blandford Cemetery, Petersburg, Va., from the correspondent of the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, and published in its issue of June 8, 1890, and republished in the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XVII, pp. 388-403, occurs the following the retreat as was ever performed in the halcyon days of the Confederacy? The truth of history—a letter from Brig.-Gen. Lane. [for the Dispatch.] Richmond, Va., September 19, 1867. The Petersburg Index, in its editorial notice of Mr. Pollard's new work entitled, Lee and His Lieutenants, does great injustice to Lane
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
promise to come back and redeem his chief, they ken neither the heart of a Hielandman, nor the honor of a gentleman. Point Lookout. Address before Pickett Camp Confederate Veterans, October 10, 1890. by past Commander Charles T. Loehr. [Richmond (Va.) times, October 11, 1890.] George E. Pickett Camp Confederate Veterans held a meeting which was largely attended last night. Past Commander Charles T. Loehr read an interesting and valuable paper on Point Lookout, for which the Camp retur91—its first recurrence after such action—reverently and generally observed throughout the State. The States of Georgia, Maryland and New York also rendered affectionate tribute to the memory to the immortal Chief of the Armies of the South. In Richmond the weather was perfect. Not a cloud obscured the sky from the rising of the sun until the going down thereof. About 2 o'clock P. M. the various bodies of military began to assemble. A little later and the waving of flags, tap of drum,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4 (search)
In memoriam. General Joseph Eggleston Johnston. The last but one of the six full generals of the war for Southern Independence (General Beauregard now alone remaining), General Joseph Eggleston Johnston, died at his residence in Washington, D. C., on the night of March 21st, 1891. His death excited profound emotion, and throughout the Southern States the testimony of regard in which he was held was touchingly manifested. Richmond. In Richmond, Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans led in the initiative. At a meeting of this body, held March 23d, a committee of which Colonel Archer Anderson was chairman, was appointed to prepare resolutions to the memory of General Johnston. The following chaste and touching tribute from the pen of Colonel Anderson was submitted by him in a meeting of Lee Camp, held March 27th, and was unanimously adopted by a rising vote: A great soldier has passed from among us. The death of General Joseph Eggleston Johnston has filled every southe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Burkett Davenport Fry. (search)
General Burkett Davenport Fry. Died at Richmond, Virginia, January 21st, 1891, General Burkett Davenport Fry, a veteran of three wars, and a most useful and valued citizen. His nature was as gentle, his bearing as modest as his life was momentous. His lineage was historic, and in his veins mingled the blood of the Huguenot with some of the worthiest strains of Virginia. He was third in descent from Colonel Joshua Fry, and his wife, Mary Micou, daughter of Dr. Paul Micou, a physician who sought refuge in Essex county, Virginia, from religious persecution in France. Colonel Fry was Professor of Mathematics in William and Mary College; in connection with Peter Jefferson, the father of President Jefferson, executed in 1749 the first map of Virginia founded on actual surveys, and was the commander of the Virginia forces raised for service against the French on the Ohio in 1754. The youthful George Washington was the lieutenant-colonel of the Virginia regiment, and on the su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General John Rogers Cooke. (search)
r sons of the Mother-State, whose valor and prestige in the ensanguined field was as prevailing as their dutiful lives as citizens have been useful and inspiring, have been relieved from earthly service. The roll is: 1891—January 21st, at Richmond, Va., Brigadier-General Burkett Davenport Fry; March 21st, at Washington, D. C., General Joseph Eggleston Johnston; April 9th, at Richmond, Va., Brigadier-General John Rogers Cooke; April 29th, at Charlottesville, Va., Brigadier-General Armistead Richmond, Va., Brigadier-General John Rogers Cooke; April 29th, at Charlottesville, Va., Brigadier-General Armistead Lindsay Long—chieftains of the war for Southern Independence—called to pass over the river, and rest Death conquers all! Yet, mortality has put on immortality! Immortality reigns! The names and deeds of these heroes are deathless! Of three of these citizen-soldiers there is record in the preceding pages. Of the remaining one—pithily characterized as upright, downright General Cooke—memorial is merited. With a nature whose ingeniousness was infectuous, the transparent earnestness of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Southern Historical Society: its origin and history. (search)
of the Southern Historical Society be transferred to Richmond, Virginia. 2. That the Convention, in order to carry out thty, to hold its seat and its archives in the city of Richmond, Virginia, with affiliated societies to be organized in all thof the Executive Committee: General Dabney H. Maury, Richmond, Va., Chairman. General Maury, so long and prominently idobert E. Withers, Wytheville, Va. Colonel Joseph Mayo, Richmond, Va. Rev. John Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va., Lieutenant-ColoneRichmond, Va., Lieutenant-Colonel Archer Anderson, Richmond, Va. Major Robert Stiles, Richmond, Va. George L. Christian, Esq., Richmond Va. On motion, tRichmond, Va. Major Robert Stiles, Richmond, Va. George L. Christian, Esq., Richmond Va. On motion, the Society then adjourned to meet at Richmond, Va., on the call of the President. Pursuant to the above, the Society met Richmond, Va. George L. Christian, Esq., Richmond Va. On motion, the Society then adjourned to meet at Richmond, Va., on the call of the President. Pursuant to the above, the Society met at Richmond, in the Capitol, in the Senate chamber, at 8 o'clock P. M., October 29, 1873. After prayer by Rev. George WoodRichmond, Va., on the call of the President. Pursuant to the above, the Society met at Richmond, in the Capitol, in the Senate chamber, at 8 o'clock P. M., October 29, 1873. After prayer by Rev. George Woodbridge, D. D,, of the Episcopal Church, the President, General Jubal A. Early, introduced with eulogistic remarks, General W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 28 (search)
ot paroled at Appomattox was because they obeyed orders to disband and shift for themselves. I have written this much in justice to that little band of heroic men who ever responded with promptness and gallantry to every command on that never-to-be-forgotten retreat from Petersburg to Appomattox; who saved a part of the cavalry from a shameful stampede at Namazine Creek; who met and successfully resisted the charging columns of General Custer near Amelia Courthouse, saving, in all probability, the great Lee from capture; who, as before mentioned, captured the last guns at Appomattox, and having remained faithful and loyal to the last, I beg that you will give this a place in your forthcoming volume, to the end that their devotion to duty and a proof of their heroic valor may be preserved and transmitted to those who are to come after them. Very respectfully, W. P. Roberts, Late Brigadier-General C. S. A. R. A. Brock, Esq., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Escape of prisoners from Johnson's Island. (search)
ichmond Howitzers, a member of the firm of Messrs. R. H. Bosher's Sons. At Montreal the fugitives were duly supplied with money by Hon. James P. Holcombe, Confederate States Commissioner. They made their way to Nassau, from whence they ran the blockade, coming into the port of Wilmington, North Carolina. Their suffering from the cold in crossing the lake was great, and several of them narrowly escaped the loss of their hands and feet from frost bite. Captain Davis was a native of Richmond, Virginia, and was the son of William H. Davis, long a successful coal-dealer who lost his life in the capitol disaster—the falling through of the floor of the Court of Appeals—during the contest of the late Hon. Henry K. Ellyson for the post of mayor—April 27, 1870. Captain Davis enlisted in Company B., First Virginia Infantry, Captain James K. Lee, April 21, 1861. He was soon afterwards promoted to sergeant and served as such at the first battle of Manassas. In September following, he wa<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ead at, 293; oration of Hon. E. C. Walthall, 298; description of the monument, 315; history of the Confederate Memorial Association of, 315. Jericho Ford, Battle of, 71, 75. Johnson's Island, Escape of Prisoners from, 428. Johnston, General Bradley T., Address of, at Fredericksburg, Va., 398 Johnston, Capt. George B., 52; tribute to, 124, 410. Johnston, Gen. Joseph E., Death of, 94; Last Days of the Army of, Address by J. M. Mullen, 97; memorial observances in honor of, at Richmond, Va.. 158; at Memphis, Tenn., 189; at New Orleans, La., 210; his report of the battle of Seven Pines, 182; account of the wounding of, 185; details of life of, 192; his campaign in northern Georgia, 265; Resolutions of United Confederate Veterans in honor of, 292; mentioned. 380. Jones, Jr. Ll.D., Col. C. C., Address of, 92; death of wife of, 93. Jones' Farm, Battle of. 411. Jones, M. D., Prof. Joseph, first Secretary of Southern Historical Society, 352. Jones D. D., Rev. J. Wm., 3