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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 86 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 45 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 32 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 32 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Pensacola (Florida, United States) or search for Pensacola (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
ances when Southern officers had determined to go with their States, they turned over their commands or trusts to the government and went away with clean skirts, but in the case of navy yards this rule did not seem to hold good, as was shown at Pensacola and Norfolk; and every impediment was thrown in Commodore McCauley's way by his own subordinates to prevent his carrying out the orders of the department. The disloyalty which existed to such an extent among the officers did not at that timeThey gave us a three hours hard fight at Arkansas Post, but in the end they all returned to their rightful owners, many of them indented with Union shot and not a few permanently disabled. Had it not been for the guns captured at Norfolk and Pensacola, the Confederates would have found it a difficult matter to arm their fortifications for at least a year after the breaking out of hostilities, at the expiration of which time they began to manufacture their own ordnance, and import it from abr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
vessels of the Squadron were stationed as follows: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Where Stationed. Sabine Frigate 50 Pensacola. St. Louis Sloop 20 Pensacola. Brooklyn Steamer 25 Pensacola. Wyandotte Steamer 5 Pensacola. Macedonian SloPensacola. Brooklyn Steamer 25 Pensacola. Wyandotte Steamer 5 Pensacola. Macedonian Sloop 22 Vera Cruz. Cumberland Sloop 24 Returning from Vera Cruz. Pocahontas Steamer 5 Powhatan Steamer 11 8 vessels   162   The Powhatan arrived at New York March 12, 1861, and sailed early in April for Fort Pickens. The PocahontaPensacola. Wyandotte Steamer 5 Pensacola. Macedonian Sloop 22 Vera Cruz. Cumberland Sloop 24 Returning from Vera Cruz. Pocahontas Steamer 5 Powhatan Steamer 11 8 vessels   162   The Powhatan arrived at New York March 12, 1861, and sailed early in April for Fort Pickens. The Pocahontas reached Hampton Roads on the 12th of March, and the Cumberland on the 23d of the same month. Of vessels on foreign stations the following had returned in obedience to orders from the Department. From Mediterranean: Name. Class. No. of GunPensacola. Macedonian Sloop 22 Vera Cruz. Cumberland Sloop 24 Returning from Vera Cruz. Pocahontas Steamer 5 Powhatan Steamer 11 8 vessels   162   The Powhatan arrived at New York March 12, 1861, and sailed early in April for Fort Pickens. The Pocahontas reached Hampton Roads on the 12th of March, and the Cumberland on the 23d of the same month. Of vessels on foreign stations the following had returned in obedience to orders from the Department. From Mediterranean: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Richmond Steam Sloop 16 July 3. Susquehanna Steam Sloop 15 June 6. Iroquois Steam Sloop 6 June 15. From coast of Africa: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Constellation Sloop 22 Sept. 28. Portsmout<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
avies hold a larger place in the memory of old sailors than some more important achievements. One of these cutting-out expeditions took place in the harbor of Pensacola, and is worthy to be chronicled in history, for from all accounts it was a gallant affair, and most creditable to those who commanded and executed it. There ikens was fully manned and all the guns mounted necessary to give it a superiority over the batteries of General Bragg on the navy yard side, it was supposed that Pensacola was hermetically sealed, not only against the entrance of blockade runners, but that Pickens would prevent the exit of any hostile vessel intended to prey upon A did not seem to attach much importance to the Union fort or its auxilliary works, and it was reported to Commodore Mervin, the commander of the naval forces off Pensacola, that the schooner Judah was fitting out at the Pensacola Navy Yard as a privateer to prey upon our commerce. This vessel had been seen from day to day lying in
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
etween the Federal and Confederate forces at Pensacola. Both the Niagara and Richmond were vessedment. The history of the manner in which Pensacola was held by the Confederates from April 1st,ard the fort, as had been done at Sumter. Pensacola, with its well-equipped Navy Yard, was too tl exhibit this order to any naval officer at Pensacola if you deem it necessary after you have estarson whatever until you reach the H arbor of Pensacola. Abraham Lincoln. Recommended, Wm. H. Sewar was seen to be coming from the direction of Pensacola, and heading for the two ships lying outsidewisely decamped in time. Thus the harbor of Pensacola again fell into the hands of the Government,ssemble any number of troops they pleased at Pensacola, erect batteries, and prepare for any continapt. H. A. Adams, Commanding Naval Force off Pensacola. Sir — Your dispatch of April 1st is receded from the ships at that time anchored off Pensacola, and this help never would have been afforde[9 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
ishment for improper talk among them was to tie a rope around the offenders and let them float in the stinking ditch. The impression we derived from this part of the conversation, however, was that the fort was very well governed, and that the man who was speaking had not often come under the displeasure of the authorities, for he was not eloquent on the subject of his wrongs. The chain, as first stretched across the river, was quite a formidable obstacle. The chain was brought from Pensacola, and was a very heavy one. It was supported by heavy logs, 30 feet long, only a few feet apart, to the under side of each of which the chain was pinned near the up stream end. The chain was kept from sagging down too far by seven heavy anchors, from which small chains ran to the main chain. These anchors were buoyed with can-buoys taken from Pilot Town. In a few months a raft formed on the upper side of this chain which reached up to the forts, and its weight swept away the whole obst
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
towards Vicksburg, whose heights had been heavily fortified. The flag-officer did not feel justified in attacking the stronghold without the mortar flotilla, which he deemed indispensable to shell out the heights, but the mortars were then at Pensacola and it took them some twenty days to reach the scene of action. Sixteen mortars being then placed in position they proceeded to shell the batteries on the hills, with such good effect that Farragut's ships passed Vicksburg with very little lt servant, D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States Steamer Octorora, Vicksburg, July 3, 1862. Sir — Agreeably to the orders received from you I sailed from Pensacola on the 3d of June, and on the 9th had all the mortar vessels in New Orleans. On the 13th, sixteen vessels, in tow of the steamers, had left for Vicksburg, on half rations, the officers and men being desirous to arrive at the scene of action in
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
marks. While Flag-officer Farragut was engaged in the operations before Vicksburg, down to the time when he passed the batteries at Port Hudson, many events occurred in the fleet which have not been mentioned heretofore, as it could not have been done without interrupting the narrative of current events. Farragut's command up to May, 1863, included the Mississippi River as far as Vicksburg, and all its tributaries below; also the coasts of Louisiana, Florida and Texas, extending from Pensacola on the east to the mouth of the Rio Grande, including that network of bays, streams, inlets, bayous, sounds, and island groups which extends from the mouth of the Mississippi as far west as Sabine Pass, and the difficult bars and channels leading to Galveston, Matagorda and Corpus Christi, where none but the smallest vessels could enter, and which afforded safe refuges for blockade-runners during the entire war. This coast, with its indentations, is over 600 miles in length, and had to
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
on the 4th of June, 1862. The Navy Department had found an opportunity to reward this gallant officer for his services at New Orleans, and although no important military or naval movements were going on within the limits of this command, it was the only way in which the Secretary of tile Navy could show his high appreciation of Bailey's gallantry and devotion to his country's service. The limits of this command extended along the Florida Peninsula from Cape Canaveral on the east, to Pensacola on the west. Up to December, 1863, the little squadron under Bailey had exercised the greatest watchfulness along the coast, had captured many prizes, and had apparently broken up the illicit traffic by which the Confederates had been supplied with munitions of war. Lying adjacent to Cuba, and at no great distance from the English possessions of Nassau and Bermuda, the coast of Florida presented many available points for the introduction of all kinds of material by means of small vessel
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
Berwick's Bay, between Berwick City and Franklin, on the Bayou Teche, directly on the line of march for Alexandria and Shreveport. Small garrisons were left at Brownsville and Matagorda Bay, in Texas--positions which, under instructions from the President and subsequently from Lieutenant-General Grant, were not to be abandoned — at New Orleans and at Port Hudson, which was threatened by a vigorous and active enemy. Smaller garrisons at Baton Rouge and Donaldson ville on the river, and at Pensacola and Key West on the coast, constituted the balance of forces under my command, It had been arranged that the troops concentrated at Franklin should move for the Red River on the 7th of March, to meet the forces of General Sherman at Alexandria on the 17th. But, for causes stated by General Franklin, their march was delayed until the 13th, at which time the advance, under General A. L Lee, left Franklin, the whole column following soon after and arriving at Alexandria, the cavalry on th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
see surrenders. incidents of battle. the wounded transferred to Pensacola. names of killed and wounded. Farragut's detailed report of batre of driving from before Mobile. He then intended to proceed to Pensacola and raise the siege in that quarter. There is no doubt that, hadnded, suggested that they should all — of both sides — be sent to Pensacola, where they would alike be properly cared for; and the Admiral, wnder a flag of truce, with or without the Union wounded, to go to Pensacola, with the understanding that the vessel should take out nothing boo much; those who are, seldom do as much as they ought. When in Pensacola, he spent days on the bar, placing the buoys in the best positionepared by 8 o'clock in the evening for removal to the hospital at Pensacola, for which place they left at daylight on the following morning issel some sixty badly wounded officers and men, to be conveyed to Pensacola. He was untiring in his attention, watching and tending them at
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