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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 86 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 45 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 32 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 32 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pensacola (Florida, United States) or search for Pensacola (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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ations, it has practically conceded belligerent rights to the enemy. It has not treated captured secessionists as traitors, but has extended to them the usual courtesies of war. The Southern authorities, on the other hand, have commissioned letters of marque, and these sea rovers, if the account be true, have proved in a very satisfactory manner that the Federal blockade, extending over a coast of more than two thousand miles, is only valid on paper. An American correspondent writing from Pensacola the other day, not only stated, but professed to give, the text of a letter in which Admiral Milne, the commander of the British squadron, had officially notified to the Admiralty that the blockade of the Southern ports was altogether ineffectual. On a former occasion we expressed a doubt whether so discreet and experienced an officer as Admiral Milne would have committed an act so obviously beyond the pale of his duty. The authoritative contradiction which has been given to this clever
. If it shall be asserted that an error has been committed in thus providing for the wants of the service and the Government, a much greater error would have been committed, it is believed, in the omission to have made such provision under the existing necessities. vessels in service. Of the 69 vessels, carrying 1,346 guns, hereinbefore mentioned, as available for service on the 4th of March last, the Levant has been given up as lost in the Pacific; the steamer Fulton was seized at Pensacola; and one frigate, two sloops, and one brig were burnt at Norfolk. These vessels carried 172 guns. The other vessels destroyed at Norfolk were considered worthless, and are not included in the list of available vessels. These losses left at the disposal of the Department 62 vessels, carrying 1,174 guns, all of which are now, or soon will be, in commission, with the exception of the-- Vermont, ship-of-the-line,84 Brandywine, frigate,50 Decatur, sloop, at San Francisco,16 John Hanc
ich they claim to have a perfect right. In direct conflict with this are all the official notifications of United States officers. Capt. Adams, for instance, writing on board the Sabine, on May 19, says in a letter to Gen. Bragg: This (Pensacola) port is now strictly blockaded, &c. Commodore Mervin's announcements — I have not seen any of them — are said to be similarly worded; and I am told that the President of the United States publicly promulgated the blockade of all the ports s each other have been for weeks blockaded, and not blockaded, at the same time. The confusion arising from this state of things can be imagined by your lordships. On the 19th of May, as you will see by the enclosed circular, the blockade of Pensacola began; yet, up to the 30th of that month, vessels freely obtained admission; some had leave to do so, others were not even overhauled, and others, still, seemed to defy the cruisers. One bark, ordered off from the Pensacola entrance, through a
y 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a war garrison of 5,430 men. We find, as was shown here the other day, and as has Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pierced for 1,099 guns, and are adapted for a war garrison of 5,430 men. We find, as was shown here the other day, and as has been shown on former occasions, that the State of South Carolina seceded, or attempted to secede, from this confederacy of States without cause. In seceding, her first step was a violation of the Constitution. She seceded on the 20th of last December, making the first innovation and violation of the law and the Constitution of the country. On the 28th day of December what did she do? She seized Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, and caused your little band of sixty or seventy men under the
of the blockade for a few days would have amounted, comparatively, to nothing. And further, it was only after the repeated requests and urgings of all the officers that Capt. Poor concluded to send notice to the flag-officer of the squadron at Pensacola, informing him of the escape of the Sumter. I repeat it, that had it not been for the repeated urgings of our officers, we would have gone back to our old anchorage, from which place there is no manner nor chance of communication with PensacolPensacola. However, after the representation of the officers in question, a boat was sent up to the gunboat Massachusetts, despatching her to the flag-officer with the information of the Sumter's escape. We learned subsequently that the Niagara had gone in pursuit of her; we hope soon to overhaul her; yet, in the mean time, I repeat, she may capture millions of dollars' worth of property, sink and burn at pleasure, and all this must be suffered, owing to Capt. Poor's very poor judgment in the matte
militia of the different States into the service of his Government, proposes to inaugurate civil war on a comprehensive plan. Under the circumstances, I have thought it not inappropriate that I should offer some suggestions to your Excellency, in my capacity of commanding officer of the first military district. Presuming that Mr. Lincoln will be advised by good military talent, he will doubtless regard this place as next in importance, in a strategic point of view, to Charleston and Pensacola. He will therefore retain at the arsenal all of the troops now there, and augment it as soon as possible. The commanding officer of that place, as you are perhaps aware, has strengthened his position by the erection of numerous batteries and earthworks. You are not, however, aware that he has recently put in position guns of large calibre, to command the approaches to the city by the river, as well as heavy ten-inch mortars, with which he could, at any moment, bombard our town. If, t