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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
elf in communication with the Navy. Grant had had too much experience in the West not to know what valuable aid a naval force could afford an army under certain circumstances, not to wish to take advantage of it in the present instance. In consequence of this resolution Grant moved by Lee's right flank, and threw his army across the James River, with the hope of seizing Petersburg, while his cavalry could destroy the railroad communication between Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley and Lynchburg. The movement was skillfully executed, and, on the 14th of June, the Army was safe on the opposite bank of the James, and in communication with the Army of the James and with the Navy. The day General Grant passed the James he gave an order to sink the obstructions in Trent's Reach, and on the 15th General Butler wrote to Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee, informing him of Grant's order, and saying that he would be glad if the admiral would assist him in carrying it out. On the 15th of June G