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y, 6 pieces of light artillery, and a company of cavalry of 90 men. General Johnston also arrived, about noon on the 20th, with Jackson's brigade, This brigade reached Manassas Junction the evening previous. So did, at a later hour, the 7th and 8th Georgia regiments. 2611 strong, a portion of Bee's and Bartow's brigades numbering 2732 bayonets, 300 of Stuart's cavalry, and Imboden's and Pendleton's batteries; to which were added Barksdale's 13th Mississippi regiment, which came up from Lynchburg; and Hampton's Legion, 600 strong. General Johnston was now the ranking officer at Manassas; nevertheless, as General Beauregard had already made all his plans and arrangements for the maintenance of the position, of which General Johnston was, as yet, completely uninformed, he declined assuming the responsibilities of the command until after the impending battle, but offered General Beauregard his personal services on the field, which were cordially accepted. General Beauregard thereu
e authority—which is given in full in the Appendix to Chapter VIII. of this work. For convenience, we copy it again, as follows: Richmond, July 19th, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: We have no intelligence from General Johnston. If the enemy in front of you has abandoned an immediate attack, and General Johnston has not moved, you had better withdraw the call upon him, so that he may be left to his full discretion. The italics are ours. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washington of the projected movement of Generals Johnston and Holmes, and may vary his plans in conformity thereto. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General. Had General Beauregard obeyed the instructions there given by the War Department, and withdrawn his call upon General Johnston, need we say that no junction would have taken place at all, and that the success by which it was at
cess was announced to the War Department; what answer came back? The despatch has already been given, but it is necessary to lay it again before the reader. Richmond, July 19th, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va.: We have no intelligence from General Johnston. If the enemy in front of you has abandoned an immediate attack, and General Johnston has not moved, you had better withdraw the call upon him, so that he may be left to his full discretion. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washington of the projected movement of Generals Johnston and Holmes, and may vary his plans in conformity thereto. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General. Even at this critical juncture, when no further doubt could exist of the enemy's intention to rush upon our lines in overwhelming force—the inevitable result of our defeat being the capture of Richmond—President Davis, so far from
d Colonel Pryor, at Richmond, to meet him at Nashville, that he might see with his own eyes, and make known to the Military Committee and to the government the exact condition of affairs in the Western Department. Colonel Pryor came as far as Lynchburg, Va., but hearing that communications with Nashville were interrupted, and that the enemy was at Florence and Tuscumbia, concluded to go back to Richmond. The day after his arrival at Nashville, General Beauregard, in reply to a letter from Colonel Pryor, dated February 9th, wrote him the following: Nashville, Tenn., February 14th, 1862. Dear Colonel,—Your favor of the 9th inst. has been received. I regret much you did not come on from Lynchburg, for the rumors you refer to were all unfounded, and the matters General Johnston and myself had to communicate, through you, to the government, were of great importance—being to provide for the very unfortunate contingency now existing here. Moreover, I desired you to see for
anassas, Va.: McRae's regiment, N. C., goes to you this evening. Barksdale's Mississippi regiment goes to you from Lynchburg. Further reinforcements have promise of transportation in the morning. Hampton's Legion and others will go as soon asd, you had better withdraw the call upon him so that he may be left to his full discretion. All the troops arriving at Lynchburg are ordered to join you. From this place we will send as fast as transportation permits. The enemy is advised at Washis; and in rear of this support was also Barksdale's 13th regiment Mississippi Volunteers, which had lately arrived from Lynchburg. Along the edge of a pine thicket in rear of and equidistant from McLean's and Blackburn's fords, ready to support e1st Corps Army of the Potomac. II. They are authorized to open recruiting stations at Fredericksburg, Richmond, and Lynchburg, and the assistant quartermaster of this corps will furnish them with transportation to these points, and also to thems