Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) or search for Lynchburg (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
ld pursuant to adjournment, the memorial adopted, and a committee appointed to get signatures to the petition and forward it to Hon. Robert Jemison, Jr., C. S. Senator, and Hon. W. P. Chilton, Representative from Ala., for presentation to the Confederate Congress. Feb. 2. Called at Dr. Terrell's, near Orange Court House, and met his pretty daughter, Mrs. Goodwin. At night received five letters and several Georgia and South Carolina papers. Feb. 3. Gus. Reid returned from absence at Lynchburg. Orders came at night to be ready to move to Hanover Junction at 6 o'clock. Battle's Ala. brigade left winter quarters at 6 1/2 o'clock for Gordonsville, and arrived there at 2 P. M. We took cars at midnight for Hanover Junction. Gen. Robt. D. Johnston's N. C. brigade preceded ours. Feb. 5. Reached the Junction at 9 A. M., and occupied some old winter quarters near Taylorsville. Feb. 6. Bill Mims returned from furlough. Feb. 7. Our brigade took the train for Richmond early in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
ght take its place. The major-general, no doubt, is well aware of the condition of affairs, and although (he is) not now on duty, I appeal to his influence if it can be exerted. A copy of this is sent direct to the General Commanding the Army. The foregoing appeal resulted in the relief of that division from its onerous service. In an interview with General Lee, Whiting suggested and requested that orders be issued requiring him to take his own brigade and that of Hood, by rail, via Lynchburg, to join General Jackson's forces in the Valley of Virginia, and then march with those forces to rejoin the main army. The instructions were given and executed; and these two brigades, under Whiting's command, played an important part in Lee's operations against McClellan in front of Richmond, and continued under Lee until Whiting was selected by the Confederate Government to take charge of the defences of Wilmington and the Cape Fear District. In the meantime I had partially regaine
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
eake, of Goochland; Charles Bruce, of Charlotte; Joseph W. Anderson, of Botetourt; Pichegru Woolfolk, of Caroline; Henry Rives, of Nelson; Colonel J. W. Moore's Battalion, of North Carolina; the battery of Captain Dawson, of Georgia; Latham, of Lynchburg; Lewis, of Halifax, and many others from Virginia, Mississippi, one from Maryland, and others which cannot be recalled now. General George W. Randolph in the meantime had become Secretary of War, and during his term in that office the conscrcharge of the large department of exemption and details in the conscript service. The order and letter books of that branch of the service were under the direction and care of Mr. John W. Bransford, who at this time is Treasurer of the city of Lynchburg, or holds an important place in the government of that city. John C. Shields. Early preparation of the Howitzers. Colonel Shields, in a recent letter to a friend, gives an interesting explanation of the thorough preparation of the Richm
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
Hoge had been recommended, but an influential elder opposed the call on the ground that he did not think the young minister qualified for the position. Licensed to preach. Dr. Hoge was licensed to preach at a meeting of the Presbytery in Lynchburg. The circumstances were without parallel. It was the same church in which his father had been licensed, and what made the event unique was that Dr. Hoge's father was Moderator of the Presbytery and gave the charge to his son. Thus three generct that his first sermon as an ordained minister of the Gospel was preached in Walker's church, near this place, then an old weather-beaten building, with a central aisle dividing the sexes, as was the custom at that time. On his return from Lynchburg, whither he had gone on horseback to receive his license from presbytery to preach, he stopped on a Saturday afternoon at the house of a friend to spend the night and ensuing Sabbath. The next day he accompanied the family to church. A reviva
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph Wheeler. (search)
with his class-mate, General Thomas L. Rosser, as soon as Fort Sumter was fired on, although he was certain of graduation at the close of the session. After spending a few days at home young Pelham went to Montgomery, whence be was ordered to Lynchburg, as inspector of ordnance. Continuing, Mr. Cox briefly reviewed some of Pelham's greatest military achievements. Soon he was placed in command of the artillery on the left wing at Sharpsburg. General Stonewall Jackson, observing his acti when the thunders of war summoned him back to his native State, a week before the graduation of his class, when he would have received his commission in the United States Army. He was immediately put in charge of the Confederate Ordnance at Lynchburg, Va., with the rank of first lieutenant, and was shortly after assigned as drillmaster to Albertus's Battery, at Winchester. His handling of the guns at the first Battle of Manassas established his reputation as a fearless officer and a skilful a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The red Artillery. (search)
not be repaired, and that the city must be evacuated at 12 o'clock that night. I was ordered to remove the stores of the arsenal, as far as could be done, to Lynchburg, and was informed that the President and chief officials would proceed to Danville, and the line be reestab-lished between Danville and Lynchburg. I immediateLynchburg. I immediately had the canal-boats of the city taken possession of, and began to load them as rapidly as possible with machiney, tools, stores, etc., to be carried to Lynchburg. As a large supply of prepared ammunition could not be taken, I had a large force employed in destroying it by throwing it in the river. Supplies of value to famLynchburg. As a large supply of prepared ammunition could not be taken, I had a large force employed in destroying it by throwing it in the river. Supplies of value to families were given away to those who applied. By midnight the boats laden with stores were placed under charge of officers and started for their destination, which they never reached. What became of them, I never knew. About 2 o'clock in the morning General Gorgas, the Chief of Ordnance, came to the arsenal to tell me that he wa