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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 388 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 347 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 217 51 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 153 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 146 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 132 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 128 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 128 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
Lee. Pope, disappointed at not finding Jackson at Manassas, and confused by the different movements that different portions of Jackson's corps had made, was utterly disconcerted and directed his army to move towards Centreville where they could easily join with the forces of McClellan then at Alexandria. Almost any other soldier would have been satisfied with what had been already accomplished—the destruction of the immense stores of the enemy—the forcing of Pope from the Rappahannock to Bull Run, and the demoralization produced in the Federal army, but General Jackson knew that the Confederate design demanded that a battle with Pope should be made before reinforcements were received from McClellan, and so he determined with his little army to attack the Federal forces and compel them to stop and give battle. Our army lay concealed by the railroad cut, the woods and the configuration of the ground near the same field that we had fought the first battle of Manassas. The different
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
ransportation facilities, the three companies were enabled to reach their destination and join the regiment which was then in quarters at Camp Wigfall, near the late battle-field. For several weeks encamped at this place, the regiment suffered exceedingly from sickness. By the surgeon's statement the sick-call at one time numbered 240, while fifty-seven of the cases were typhoid fever. The mortality was large. From camp to camp the command was moved until it went into winter-quarters on Bull Run in December, where it remained, with only such changes in position as the exigencies of the situation in outpost and picket duty required, until the 8th day of March, 1862. Meantime the regiment had been incorporated into a brigade with the 5th N. C. State Troops, Colonel Duncan K. McRae; the 20th Georgia, Colonel Smith; the 24th Virginia, Colonel Jubal A. Early, and the 38th Virginia, of which brigade Colonel Early being the ranking officer, he was placed in command, subsequently being co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
16,000 men was resisting General Pope's entire army. On the 28th the command formed line of battle for the memorable second battle of Manassas, which was a series of battles for three days. Pender's Brigade took possession of the bridge across Bull Run and engaged the enemy across the river. His brigade finally crossed over to the east side, but the enemy withdrew. The loss was very slight. On Friday, the 29th, the enemy changed position and was attempting to interpose his arms between Genee made against Hill's division and each time repulsed. General Jackson said: The three brigades of Archer, Pender and Thomas held together and drove everything before them, capturing the batteries and many prisoners, resting that night on Bull Run, and the ground thus won was occupied that night. These brigades had penetrated so far within the enemy's lines that Captain Ashe, assistant adjutantgen-eral to General Pender, was taken prisoner that night returning from my headquarters to his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
pon the greatest disasters of the war. The wisdom of the Secretary of State struck me with very great force. It was an aspect of the case that in all my thought upon the subject I had entirely overlooked. The result was that I put the draft of the proclamation aside, as you do your sketch for a picture, waiting for a victory. From time to time I added or changed a line, touching it up here and there, waiting the progress of events. Well, the next news we had was of Pope's disaster at Bull Run. Things looked darker than ever. Finally came the week of Antietam. I determined to wait no longer. The news came, I think, on Wednesday, that the advantage was on our side. I was then staying at the Soldiers' Home. Here I finished writing the second draft of the preliminary proclamation; came up on Saturday, called the cabinet together to hear it, and it was published the following Monday. An incident of the last-mentioned cabinet meeting not mentioned by Lincoln was related to M