hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 29 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 4 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 20 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 14 4 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) or search for Maysville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

f soul. The feature of his character most remarked by his contemporaries was, in his early boyhood, an energy that made him an acknowledged leader among his comrades; later, it was a self-contained dignity and reserved power that subjected affections, will, and passions, to the performance of duty. His eldest sister says of him that, when he was a boy, he was fearless and impetuous; but kind, affectionate, and just; amenable to reason, and deferential to age. Mr. J. G. Hickman, of Maysville, writing in 1869, after consulting all the old folk, says: My aunt and Mr. Lashbrooke remember General Johnston from his infancy; and they say, as indeed all say, that there was great promise about him from his childhood. He was a handsome, proud, manly, earnest, and self-reliant boy; and his success and distinction in after-life were only what were expected of him by those who knew him in his boyhood. Mr. Lashbrooke says he went to the same school with him, in 1811, to Mann Butler,
He did not directly interfere with the affairs of the State, and this, together with his absence, seemed a confirmation of the neutrality policy. Meanwhile, Nelson, Rousseau, and the Union committees were secretly enlisting troops and introducing arms and ammunition. Those who had been indulging in dreams of peace were now rudely awakened. On the 1st of September, Anderson removed his headquarters to Louisville, and Nelson was made a brigadier-general and began to organize a force at Maysville to operate in Eastern Kentucky. He was replaced at Camp Dick Robinson by Brigadier-General George H. Thomas, a soldier of ability, vigor, and experience. Thomas was a native of Southampton County, Virginia, a West-Pointer, and a man of mark in the old army. He was the junior major of the Second Cavalry, General Johnston's regiment; and, having decided to adhere to the Federal cause in the civil war, was rapidly promoted to the rank of brigadier-general. His position at Camp Dick Robin
n 3,000 men), making over 6,000 effectives in all. history of the army of the Cumberland, vol. I., p. 29. General Thomas had at camp Dick Robinson four Kentucky, two East Tennessee, and several regiments from Ohio and Indiana; Ibid., vol. I., pp. 21-37. probably 6,000 men. He had also a large auxiliary force of home Guards, useful to protect roads and keep the disloyal element in awe. General William Nelson had six regiments of infantry, besides cavalry and artillery, at and near Maysville, probably 4,000 men. Ibid., vol. I., pp. 74, 75. here we have 34,000 volunteers; and, with home Guards, probably over 40,000 troops. to oppose this force General Johnston had, available under Polk, 11,000 troops (estimated); under Buckner, 4,000 men; and under Zollicoffer, 4,000 more. The whole force in Zollicoffer's district of East Tennessee consisted nominally of ten regiments of infantry, seventeen companies of cavalry, and a six-gun battery of six-pounders; but only five regi