Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. You can also browse the collection for Medford (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Medford (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

Stone elm, East Watertown, stands near the corner of Washington and Grove streets. It is said to have been brought from Fresh Pond in 1763. On the Brooks estate, at West Medford, are several old trees, and some of them, the hickories, if tradition may be believed, were in their prime at the time of the Revolution. A black walnut was planted on the estate some time previous to 1768. Mr. Peter C. Brooks set out a horse-chestnut in 1810, and an elm tree at a later time. On Main street, Medford, are three elm trees which are of interest, not so much from their age, which is said to be fifty or sixty years, but from the fact that their immediate ancestor was brought from England in a bandbox at an early date. Until within ten or fifteen years a row of fine elm trees could be seen over-topping the houses along Inman street, Cambridge. They marked the line of an old road, which is shown on all Revolutionary maps, which led from Charlestown to that part of Cambridge where the City
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, Elizur Wright's work for the Middlesex Fells. (search)
he could get knowledge or inspiration. Mr. Wright's discovery of the Fells was not till 1864, when he came to live in Medford, and until 1880 his time was still pressed with other important work, but he did not forget the city's need of a park. In Medford, with his home on Pine Hill, and from its top rock a glimpse of the city and ocean, and on all other sides rocks, dells, hills, and the almost unbroken woods, another site, nearer Boston, richer and more varied in its wild pictures, and was the one adopted. During the next two months these able advocates had made such headway that the mass meeting held in Medford January 1, 1881, was crowded and addressed by speakers who, having just returned from a smart drive through the Fells, whe Fells Association, might elect committees and employ them. Such a club, comprising some 200 members, he organized in Medford; and it only needed that some ten or twenty others as enterprising and as willing to work should, without his aid or pro
the lines of stone wall which divided the farms, and few or no trees. The last of the walnuts, which gave the name to the hill originally, were cut down by the soldiers encamped on Winter Hill for their log huts and back-logs. Aaron B. Magoun gave to the college in its first year a tree for every student from his nursery on Winter Hill. Otis Curtis, one of the trustees, superintended the planting of most of the trees on the hill, and set out the row of willows on College avenue, towards Medford. Ladies of the Universalist societies in the vicinity of Boston used to have planting bees, with a public celebration and the planting of trees, from time to time. The row of elms set in front of the house of the first president are still standing, though the house has been moved away. Of the tract formerly known as Polly Swamp, a small piece, half an acre or less, remains on Albion street. A few oaks and some underbrush make a little spot of green, and eight cedar trees may be found i
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, Charlestown schools after 1825 (Continued.) (search)
t, will, I am sure, awaken feelings of interest in the minds of all who have thus far followed our history of the public schools of Charlestown:— Cost of schools in various towns, 1838 Wager Per Month PopulationAnnual AppropriationNumber of SchoolsMalesFemales Charlestown10,101$14,47722$50.75$17.51 Boston80,32593,000100105.0820.83 Lowell18,01014,3562844.8516.07 Salem14,30411,5802052.7721.10 Nantucket9,0486,0001261.9810.42 Roxbury7,4935,0001650.3317.20 Lynn9,2334,5001536.7412.28 Medford2,0752,700751.3914.10 Chelsea1,6592,700737.5015.59 Cambridge7,6315,419.571654.3319.48 Dorchester4,5644,6501435.4215.00 Dedham3,5323,0001131.0913.80 Brookline1,0831,050533.5012.66 Milton1,7722,000535.0021.22 1840-1841. The teachers in all the schools outside the Neck for this summer were the same as last year: No. 17, Mary E. Brown; No. 18, Caroline M. Sylvester; No. 19, Elizabeth P. Whittredge; No. 20, Sarah. M. Burnham; at the Russell district, Clara D. Whittemore; and at Gar
11, 92. Magoun, Aaron B., 69, 71, 85, 87. Magoun. John C., 49, 87, 90, 99. Magoun, Nathaniel, 23. Magoun Square, 85, 87. Main Street, 87. Main Street, Medford, 9. Malden, Mass., 9. Mann, George C., 37. Mann, Jairus, 53. Manor House, 89. March, Olive, 76. Marshall, Elizabeth B., 81. Mason Street, Boston, 100. Koun, Martha T., 71. McLean Asylum, 54, 65. Mead, Abba (Abby), 51, 67, 69, 70, 71, 73, 74, 77. Mead, Anna B., 72. Mead, Sarah A., 49. Mears, T., 15. Medford, Mass., 30. Medford Pond, 93. Medford Public Domain Club, 38. Medford River, 93. Medford Street, 54, 70, 88. Merrill, Nathan, 71, 73, 82. Methodist Meeting Hps, J., 13. Phipps, W. C., 13. Phipps, William S., 18. Pierce, —, 51, 52. Pierce, A., 12. Pierce, Charles, 20. Pierce, Toel, 21, 74, 77, 79, 83. Pine Hill, Medford, 30, 38. Pine Island Pond, 61. Pitman Street, 60. Pitts, Samuel, 46. Polly Swamp, 53, 60, 85. Pool, Lot, 16, 22. Pope, Rev. Augustus R., 59. Prescot