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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 127 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 83 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 75 15 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 39 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 38 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Galveston (Texas, United States) or search for Galveston (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hood's Brigade. (search)
ame in Virginia. Address of Don. E. Henderson at Galveston Reunion in 1901. On the occasion of the thirty-first annual reunion of Hood's Texas Brigade at Galveston, Judge Don E. Henderson, of Bryan, a former member of Company E, 5th Texas, Hood's Brigade, made the response to the address of welcome of Major Hume. He spoke as follows: ladies, Gentlemen, and comrades,—The survivors of Hood's Texas Brigade at the behests of the citizens of Galveston have met in annual reunion to do honor to their dead comrades and to the memory of the Lost Cause. A year ago your city was selected for this reunion. Your condition at that time was far different fromd faith in the future; and with such determination as is yours, you will yet scale the walls of adversity, and, like the Venice of old, the city of the Adriatic, Galveston, the metropolis of the new Mediterranean, will receive into her lap the riches of the Orient and rival in wealth and splendor the most renowned cities of ancient
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
He received us standing and our conversation lasted only a few minutes. This was my last interview with the Emperor. The news of General Lee's surrender reached us almost immediately afterward, and the briefness of the interval would itself suffice to disprove the allegations contained in the first editorial of the Washington Post on A Lost Chapter of History (March 14, 1901), from which I quote the following extract: At all events Polignac, accompanied by Moncure, went to Paris—via Galveston, we think—and though their mission was barren of result, so far as concerned the Confederacy, it leaked out when Moncure returned that Louis Napoleon had frequently consulted with Lord Palmerston and that so far from refusing to consider the proposition at all—whatever it may have been—the latter had given it a great deal of his time, and had finally dismissed it with reluctance. We have since been told that the Queen herself intervened, but we rather think that the appearance of the Rus