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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 127 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 83 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 75 15 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 39 15 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 38 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Galveston (Texas, United States) or search for Galveston (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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should be known what object was contemplated in this removal. The feeling of resistance to the movement was continued until late at night, and some of the Republicans actually seemed to think war, horrid war, was about to bristle in our midst. The real facts of the case we took pains to ascertain. It seems that the United States has for some time past been constructing a couple of forts--one at Ship Island, below New Orleans, on the east side of the Mississippi, and the other at Galveston, Texas. These forts are now ready for the reception of the ordnance. Secretary Floyd has ordered a number of eight and two inch Columbiads, and some eighteen and twenty-four pounders to be transported from our Arsenal for the purpose of arming these forts. Thus we are informed by Major Smyington, who is commandant at the Arsenal, and Major Butler, the paymaster. The circumstance was not so unusual as to attract any particular attention with the military men of our city, but just now many o