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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 113 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 7 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 60 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 36 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Monterey (California, United States) or search for Monterey (California, United States) in all documents.

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oint of operation, retaining an army corps at Monterey, or on the route thence to Mexico. These movuppose in fifteen or twenty days, will be for Monterey. General Johnston had taken great pride inh his comrades under Shivers in the attack on Monterey. The following letter, written soon aftert the forest of St. Domingo, three miles from Monterey, on the 19th. The 19th and 20th were passed clear and succinct account of the storming of Monterey I add the following interesting description officer when he fell wounded in the streets of Monterey, at the point mentioned by Mr. Davis as the pous estimate of General Johnston's conduct at Monterey: In approaching the subject of your letrom Camargo, and during the operations before Monterey, resulting in its capture, with zeal, efficiech under his command won great distinction at Monterey, and subsequently at Buena Vista performed ex After we had ridden, perhaps a mile, out of Monterey, on our way to General Taylor's headquarters,[7 more...]
lustration. He was fond of physical science, and Mrs. Somerville and Sir Charles Lyell were favorites with him. But, at the time of which I speak, his chief literary delight was a translation of Herodotus. He was the first to impress upon me the veracity of the Old Historian, and to point out the care with which he discriminated between what he saw, what he heard, and what he surmised or inferred. While I was with him, a report came that his friend, Colonel Jason Rogers, commanding at Monterey, was cooped up in the Black Fort, with a small garrison — the Louisville Legion — by an overwhelming force of Mexicans, to whom he must surrender. Hie said to me: They don't know Rogers, if they think he will surrender. He will hold the citadel to the last man, and then blow it up, before he will surrender. But I am glad he is there. He will beat the Mexicans, and has now a chance to win renown. Unfortunately, the Mexicans did not make the attempt. When the battle of Buena Vista wa
will, and regretted that more could not be done. It is, of course, painful to any gentleman to speak of himself; but I think I can say without vanity that the brevet rank conferred upon me was the discharge of a debt of twelve years standing, during nearly ten of which, as a public servant, I have not had one day's relaxation from duty, and more than half of which time, from the nature of my duties, I have not slept in a house. I say it was an old debt in this wise. At the storming of Monterey I was a volunteer, acting as inspector-general with the rank of colonel. By reference to official reports you will see that favorable mention was made of my name with others. Those belonging to the regular army were brevetted for this notice. I could not be, but received in lieu, what was very precious to me, the thanks of General Taylor in special orders. This being so, is it too much to say that the brevet was won twelve years since, and for the same grade as that now given? It is
n, all sons of his early friends; Gibson, his connection, brave, faithful, and accomplished, and many more allied by blood or marriage; and a gallant band of Texans, Wharton, Ashbel Smith, and others; with a multitude besides, known to him personally or by reputation and name as the inheritors of martial virtues. But why multiply names? Regulars were there, who had wintered with him in Utah; Texans who had known him on the border, as patriot leader, statesman, citizen, soldier; the men of Monterey and the Mexican War, and the brave soldiers who had welcomed him with shouts at Columbus, or helped him to guard the line of the Barren River all winter. He regarded all these not as strangers, not as factors to be canceled in the deadly problem of successful combat, but as of his own belonging-his kith and kin by ties almost as strong as those of blood. He looked upon them with the tenderness of a patriarchal regard — of an Abraham or a Jephthah. In the dread holocaust of war, in which