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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 113 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 7 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 60 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 40 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 36 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Monterey (California, United States) or search for Monterey (California, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
General Johnston had taken great pride and pleasure in the drill and discipline of his regiment, and General Taylor gave him the advance position in the march on Monterey. General Johnston was destined to see his hard labor of months thrown away, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided ag to Hamer's brigade of Butler's division. Remaining with Colonel Mitchell's First Ohio regiment, he was near that officer when he fell wounded in the streets of Monterey. General Butler was wounded at the same point. General Johnston's horse was thrice wounded; but, though he was a conspicuous mark for the enemy's sharp shooter and all other characteristics and elements which go to make up a great leader. It was said of him by his great civic chieftain, when he saw him on the field of Monterey: In combat he had the most inspiring presence I ever saw. Well may his great leader and captain, who led the Confederates as military chieftain, have said: When
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
General Johnston had taken great pride and pleasure in the drill and discipline of his regiment, and General Taylor gave him the advance position in the march on Monterey. General Johnston was destined to see his hard labor of months thrown away, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided ag to Hamer's brigade of Butler's division. Remaining with Colonel Mitchell's First Ohio regiment, he was near that officer when he fell wounded in the streets of Monterey. General Butler was wounded at the same point. General Johnston's horse was thrice wounded; but, though he was a conspicuous mark for the enemy's sharp shooter and all other characteristics and elements which go to make up a great leader. It was said of him by his great civic chieftain, when he saw him on the field of Monterey: In combat he had the most inspiring presence I ever saw. Well may his great leader and captain, who led the Confederates as military chieftain, have said: When
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
orning working on the trenches. In the afternoon walked over to see Jack and Billy Gordon, and rode with them into Corinth. Glorious news is circulating in camp. New Orleans is safe, Huntsville is retaken, and Jack Morgan has whipped the Federals out of Tuscumbia. The clouds are breaking. April 29th.—The regiment was detailed this morning to work on the trenches. We had worked about two hours, when we were ordered to form in line of battle. Cannonading was heard in the direction of Monterey. Halleck is advancing upon this place, and we may expect a great battle to-morrow or next day. Spent the afternoon washing my clothes and playing chess with Harry Cowperthwaite, of the Maynard Rifles. Reports from New Orleans are numerous and conflicting. May 3d.—Our regiment was re-organized to-day. Jimmy Lawrence was elected Captain of the Hickory Rifles; Dr. Butt, First Lieutenant; George Hockton, Second Lieutenant, and John Trigg Third Lieutenant. Dr. Butt was the only one of the