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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 23 7 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Mound City (Illinois, United States) or search for Mound City (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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apher of this Committee, and proceeded to Cairo and Mound City, Illinois; Columbus, Kentucky; and Fort Pillow and Memphis, T living, and they are wounded and now in the hospital at Mound City. One of them, Captain Potter, may even now be dead, as t Of the survivors, except the wounded in the hospital at Mound City, and the few who succeeded in making their escape unhurtssissippi squadron; Surgeon Horace Wardner, in charge of Mound City geneeral hospital; Captain Thomas M. Farrell, United Stathe Tennessee and Cumberland rivers are no longer ours. Mound City, eight miles above Cairo, is the great naval depot for tthis point. The Committee must observe that the loss of Mound City and Cairo would paralyze the Western army and navy. The Pennock is commandant of the naval station at Cairo and Mound City, and I understand represents Admiral Porter in his absencer, vigilant, brave, and of exceedingly safe judgment. Mound City Illinois, April 22 1864. Surgeon Horace Wardner sworn
s Darr and Down, of the same department, who had been ordered to report to me by Professor Bache, Superintendent S. S., and who all deserve the thanks of the General for labors done by them. The distances were determined before the battle for the use of artillery, and the heights of artillery positions occupied by us and the enemy. Very respectfully, W. F. Smith, Brigadier-General, Chief Engineer Military Division of the Mississippi. Report of Brigadier-General Whitaker. shell Mound, Tenn., headquarters Second brigade, Third division, Fourth corps, army of the Cumberland, Dec. 6, 1863. To Lieutenant Wright, A. A. G., First Division, Fourth Corps: The following report of the part taken by my brigade in storming Lookout Mountain, and driving the enemy from before Chattanooga, is submitted: On leaving Shell Mound, the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois, the Eighty-fourth Indiana, and the Fifth Indiana battery were detailed to defend the works erected at that place for th
ks is much to be regretted, so that our city is left in darkness as well as in ruins. Chicago times account. Cairo, March 27, 1865. Last Friday night, information reached us that Forrest had made his appearance at Paducah at two P. M., with two thousand men, and had begun an attack on that city. Colonel Hicks, commander of the post, withdrew all his men, some eight hundred, into the fort, and sent the citizens across the river to the Illinois side. The telegraph operator at Mound City said he could see a great light in the direction of Paducah, and supposed the city was in flames. General Brayman, being notified of this, sent up the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin to reinforce the garrison. Saturday morning, the steamer Iatan came down, having passed Paducah at five o'clock, at which time the buildings occupied as headquarters, quartermaster's and commissary's offices, and ammunition depot, had been destroyed; also, many other houses, and the steamer Arizona, which was on the
mander J. G. Mitchell; Eastport, Lieutenant Commander S. L. Phelps; Pittsburgh, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. R. Hoel; Mound City, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant A. R. Langthorne; Osage, Lieutenant Commander T. O. Selfridge; Neosho, Acting Volunteer Liemy's works, which could be done by making a march of thirty miles. The Benton, Pittsburgh, Chillicothe, Louisville, Mound City, Carondelet, Ouachita, Lexington, and Gazelle turned off to the left into the Atchafalaya, followed by the troops, whilcident, and had good water, the river apparently about to reach its usual stage at this season. The Cricket, Eastport, Mound City, Chillicothe, Carondelet, Pittsburgh, Ozark, Neosho, Osage, Lexington, and Fort Hindman, Louisville, and Pittsburgh, wemuel Howard, Neosho; Acting Volunteer Lieutenant George W. Browne, Ozark; Acting Volunteer Lieutenant A. R. Langthorne, Mound City; Acting Volunteer Lieutenant John Pearce, Fort Hindman; Acting Master H. H. Gorringe, Cricket; Acting Master J. S. Wats
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
the honor of our flag suffered in my hands. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, George P. Lord, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, United States Navy. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Mound City, June 29, 1864. sir: I inclose a report of the Surgeon of the Signal, who was released unconditionally by the rebels. It only corroborates all the reports I have received of the gallant defence of this vessel, which, I am told, was a most pthe honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Acting Assistant-Surgeon N. Brewster. United States steamer New national, Mound City, June 27, 1864. sir: Agreeably to your request, I have the honor of submitting the following report of the loss of the United States steamer Signal: Leaving Alexandria on the fourth of May, she proceeded down the river, and anchored at ni
Engagement at Gaines's Landing. Report of rear-admiral D. D. Porter. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Mound City, June 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith a report of Acting Ensign H. B. O'Neill, commanding United States steamer Curlew, giving an account of an attack made upon that vessel, on the morning of May twenty-fifth, by a rebel battery of ten or twelve guns, opposite Gaines's Landing. It appears that, although taken somewhat by surprise, all were quickly at their stations, and behaved well during the engagement, which lasted about twenty minutes. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Wells, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Acting Ensign H. B. O'Neill. United States steamer Curlew, May 24, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report to you that at five o'clock this morning, when opposite Gaines's Landing, Arkansas, we were fired into from a b