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Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war 23 1 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 21 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war. You can also browse the collection for Eufaula (Alabama, United States) or search for Eufaula (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 1: (search)
Chapter 1: Beginnings of the secession Movement. a negro wedding On a glorious sunshiny morning in the early summer of 1861 I was on my way to the school-house on the plantation of a gentleman who lived near Eufaula, Alabama, and in whose service I remained during the period of the war. As I was nearing the little school-room on a rising knoll, all shaded with great oaks and sentineled with tall pines, I heard skipping feet behind me, and one of my scholars exclaiming, Here is a letter for you, Miss A--! It has just been brought from the office by Ed --the negro boy who was sent every morning for the mail. A glance at the handwriting gave me to know it was from my father. I soon came to a pause in the school path: for my father wrote that my brothers were preparing to start for Richmond, Virginia, as soldiers of our new formed Southern Confederacy. As he wished to have all his children united under his roof, before the boys went away, my father earnestly de
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 5: (search)
ondary feathers of both wings were used to make one fan. Its handles were of cedar or pine wood and were sometimes made on the turner's machine, but oftener we whittled them out of cedar or pine wood ourselves. They were always covered with scraps of velvet, silk, cassimere, or merino, and bits of old faded ribbon dyed some bright color. We soon became adepts in the art of making fans out of the wing-feathers of geese, and beside those for our own use we made and sold many in the city of Eufaula for ten, fifteen, and twenty dollars apiece. A sister of Mrs. G--, who lived some little distance from us, and who owned a large flock of pea-fowls, often favored her sister with the more valuable dark olivegreen wing-feathers of her magnificent birds, and they made superb fans. I was remembered by Mrs. G--, and was given a select pair of wing-feathers. I gave my best skill to this fan, for it was to be a present to my mother. The handle I covered with a piece of dark green silk velv
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 7: (search)
l thread. When we first appeared in them, they were mistaken for the genuine imported muslins. Soon after completing and wearing our home-made muslins, news came into our settlement that a steamer had run the blockade, and that the city of Eufaula had secured some bolts of prints and other notions. The Saturday following the report, Mr. G-- ordered Ben to harness up the horses, and we were driven to Eufaula, not to buy, but simply to have a look at these imports. Sure enough, on the sheEufaula, not to buy, but simply to have a look at these imports. Sure enough, on the shelves in the store that had long lain empty, there were tastefully disposed a few bolts of English prints, some ladies' straw hats, a bolt or two of fine bleached stuff, some calico, and a few pairs of ladies' shoes. These were the magnets which had drawn us eleven miles! We had fondly imagined ourselves satisfied with our home-made cloth, and had said of it, as David of the sword of Goliath, There is none like that; give it me. When we had held aloft our knit and cloth-made shoes and slippers
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 11: (search)
rode up, and halting an instant said, General Grierson and his army are marching from Mobile to Eufaula, and they will probably reach Eufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — livedEufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — lived near the main highway, he did not expect to escape the invading army. Now, it seemed, we were to be awakened from the even tenor of our way, perhaps to know another meaning for hard times. Fear wa, composed of old men and young boys of the county, had that afternoon disbanded in the city of Eufaula, knowing that General Grierson would arrive that night or the next morning, and that resistance plantation lay, their expectation being that the Federal commander would march his column into Eufaula by a road on the other side of our settlement. When the horses' hoofs struck the bridge tha ask, Can it be that on that long April night in 1865, while the Federal army was marching into Eufaula by another road, we women and children, surrounded by negro slaves, were the sole occupants of
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 12: (search)
came after that miserable night, another courier passed through our settlement, ending our state of uncertainty with the information that the Northern army was in Eufaula. We had been entirely passed by, after all our tumult and apprehension. How thankful we were, Heaven only knows! Mr. G — came in towards night with all his of their house, because it was expected that the Federal army would come directly through their settlement, as they were not far from Mobile, and on the route to Eufaula. In our neighborhood, it was not believed at first that the enemy would find us, hence they left their own home to visit the relatives who lived near us. But rumt our settlement. They made for the public road which, according to their theory, would be the one General Grierson would be least likely to choose to march into Eufaula by. They proceeded seven or eight miles undisturbed by anything, and were congratulating themselves on being so fortunate as to flank the enemy, when just as they