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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 156 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 52 10 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 32 6 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 25 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 25 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 12 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) or search for Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. (search)
Chapter 63: the journey to Greensborough.—the surrender of Johnston. The President and his party moved to Greensborough. The President telegraphed to General Greensborough. The President telegraphed to General Johnston from Danville that Lee had surrendered, and on arriving at Greensborough, conditionally requested him to meet him there for conference, where General BeaureGreensborough, conditionally requested him to meet him there for conference, where General Beauregard had his headquarters. Mr. Davis wrote in substance of the meeting: In compliance with my request, General Johnston came to Greensborough, N. C., and withGreensborough, N. C., and with General Beauregard met me and most of my Cabinet there. Though sensible of the effect of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the consequent discourae, and private horses. The total number of prisoners thus paroled at Greensborough, N. C., as reported by General Schofield, was 36,817; in Georgia and Florida, aious points. He had a large force, of which over 36,000 were paroled at Greensborough, N. C. We had other forces in the field, and we were certainly in a position to
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 80: General Joseph E. Johnston and the Confederate treasure. (search)
rative, page 408, says: I arrived in Greensborough, near which the Confederate troops were inas a payment of silver coin to the army at Greensborough, and I have no papers which would afford igard, however, was in immediate command at Greensborough while the President was there, and doubtle the President had $2,500,000 in specie at Greensborough. I have no doubt that General Beauregard' an account for it. The $39,000 he left at Greensborough the soldiers received. Major Moses, an at and $39,000 in the military chest left at Greensborough for the army, and $20,000 accounted for byly what relates to Confederate treasure at Greensborough. Besides this, the narrative is inaccurat the amount. Just before the surrender at Greensborough, we received out of it $37,000 in silver, $288,022.90. Adding the $39,000 left at Greensborough, N. C., the Treasury contained in coin and bulvis from Richmond till his capture. At Greensborough, N. C., I accepted a loan of $100 in gold, pre[3 more...]