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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 156 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 52 10 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 32 6 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 25 9 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 25 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) or search for Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
serious being the lack of the necessary books. This want was met by the preparation of Bingham's series of English and Latin text-books, which have been republished since the war and are now used in every State of the Union. Latin Grammar, Greensboro, 1863; Caesar's Commentaries, Greensboro, 1864. Perhaps the most curious of the educational enterprises of our alumni was the law school for Confederate prisoners, established on Johnson's Island in 1863 and 1864, by Joseph J. Davis (1847-5Greensboro, 1864. Perhaps the most curious of the educational enterprises of our alumni was the law school for Confederate prisoners, established on Johnson's Island in 1863 and 1864, by Joseph J. Davis (1847-50), who was then a prisoner of war. Xii. Governor Vance and the part of North Carolina in the war. But it is not until we come to the actual administration of affairs in North Carolina that we find the most exalted position that was filled by a son of this University, for it was Zebulon B. Vance who earned for himself the distinguishing epithet of the War Governor of the South. This proud title was well deserved and has been generally recognized throughout the Union. It was earned throu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
rgeon of post; T. J. Robinson, as superintendent of laboratory, from his long experience in that branch of business in Washington, D. C., Captain J. E. P. Dangerfield was made military storekeeper and paymaster by Major Booth from long experience at the arsenal and armory at Harper's Ferry. Thomas C. DeRosset acted as Secretary in Colonel Child's office, Mr. Robert Johnson was chief clerk, and E. P. Powers assistant to Johnson. In the military storekeeper's office was William J. Woodward, who was placed in the ordnance department by Major Booth and General J. Gorgas, Chief of the Ordnance Bureau at Richmond, and he was one of the most efficient officers at the post. On the approach of General Sherman's army all work, of course, was suspended, and the entire command, after removing all the machinery possible, together with the large amount of supplies, were ordered in camp, and remained there until the surrender of Greensboro. Matthew P. Taylor, Major 6th Battalion, Armory Guard.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
Of knapsacks there were few or none, except what the men or their officers furnished. The first captain of A Company was W. F. Jones, of Caldwell county, who was succeeded by Thos. D. Jones, of the same. The entire number of rank and file in this company serving at one time or another during its whole term of service was 187 men. Company B had for its first captain James M. Neal, of McDowell county, and numbered of rank and file from first to last 171 men. Captain Columbus C. Cole, of Greensboro, commanded E Company, which numbered 184 rank and file while in service. Jesse F. Reeves, of Alleghany county, was first captain of F Company, which numbered 160 men during its term. J. A. Burns was captain of G Company at the organization of the regiment, but was shortly after succeeded by John W. Graves. The company numbered in all 145 men. Hamilton Scales, of Stokes county, was captain of H Company, which numbered in all 200 men. I Company's first captain was Shubal G. Worth, of Ran