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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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r's column, in the advance, bivouacked that night at Vienna, four and a half miles from Fairfax Court House. It rested next night at Germantown, two miles beyond Fairfax; and, on Thursday, at 9 o'clock A. M., pushed on to and through Centerville, the Rebels retiring quietly before it. Three miles beyond that village, however, the s before the battle — doubtless obtaining his information from authentic sources — thus states the disposition of our forces at that moment: Under McDowell, at Fairfax and Centerville30,000 Under Patterson, on the Shenandoah22,000 Under Mansfield, in and about Washington16,000 Under Butler, at and near Fortress Monroe11,000 o attack, and resigned the command of the army, rather than fight a battle so fettered. After the mischief was done, Runyon's division was ordered. forward from Fairfax — of course, to no purpose. But it should, at least, have been promptly employed to block completely with its bayonets the roads leading to Washington, sternly a<
demoralization of our troops, secured to the Rebels decided advantages, which each succeeding week was morally certain to diminish. They did not, however, attempt to cross the Potomac in force, nor even to provoke another battle on its south bank; but, having advanced their lines, soon after their victory, to Munson's Hill, a few miles from Alexandria, they only remained there until a night attack had been planned on our side; when, promptly forewarned by traitors, they hastily withdrew to Fairfax. It does not appear that the main body of their army ever deliberately took position this side of Centerville. Gen. McClellan commenced July 30th, 1861. by ordering the officers and men of his army out of Washington, where too many, especially of the former, had hitherto been indulged in idling away their time, to the neglect of their duties and the damage of their morals. Col. Andrew Porter, of the 16th regulars, was appointed Provost Marshal to carry this order into effect. The o
. Thompson, Jacob, fraud discovered in his Department, 410; advises the traitors of the Star of the West's departure; his resignation, 412; 485. Thompson, Judge James, of Pa., speaks in favor of the Fugitive Slave Law, 212. Thompson, George, 127. Tipton, Mo., Gen. Fremont is visited by Gen. Cameron and suite at, 590. Titus, Col., of Fla., a Border Ruffian, 243. Tod, Gov. David, of Ohio, chosen President of the Douglas Convention, 318. Tompkins. Lieut. C. H., dashes into Fairfax, 533. Toombs, Robert, of Ga., 382: his dispatch to Georgia, 384; 88; a member of Davis's Cabinet, 429. Topeka, Kansas, Free-State Convention at, 240; the Legislature at, dispersed, 244. Toucey, Isaac, in the Dem. Convention, 317. Townsend, Col. F., at Little Bethel, 529-30. Travis, Col., put to death in Texas, 150. Trenholm, Mr., of S. C., offers resolves favoring cooperation, 313-4. Trent, the, Mason and Slidell abstracted from, 606; Secretary Welles on the seizure, 60