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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
the field, and gained our road past the enemy. Anderson, Pickett and (B. R.) Johnson had left the field before we cut through and gone on to the high bridge and Farmville. At one o'clock at night we reached the high bridge and found it shut down. After getting over it we marched a mile or more on towards Farmville, and bivouackeFarmville, and bivouacked until the morning of the 7th. We were overcome by exhaustion, and without food or refreshment of any kind. There was no water but the pools, as red as brick dust, in the soil of that region. Colonel J. Thomas Goode, Captain Jordan and myself washed or cooled our faces and hands in the same pool the next morning, and neither ofrate Tyrolese hat on—not off, as ridiculously stated—and muddy all over, I put myself on foot at the head of the two brigades and marched on the railroad to near Farmville. There an officer of General Lee met me and ordered us to move to him, then in sight on his gray. Turning the head of the column to the right, down the railro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
we had to be marched through the city to the old Capitol prison under a double guard, to protect us from a threatened mob. After remaining in the old Capitol about two weeks we were taken to Johnson's Island, where I remained until June 18, 1865, when I was released, our cause being then a Lost Cause. Arrived in Richmond June 25th. Several years ago a friend of mine in St. Louis gave me a copy of the New York Herald, in which was a dispatch from one of its war correspondents, dated Farmville, Va., April 9, 1865. He spoke of the fight at Sailor's Creek as follows: Immense Slaughter of the Enemy.—The slaughter of the enemy in the fight of the 6th instant exceeded anything I ever saw. The ground over which they fought was literally strewn with their killed. The fighting was desperate, in many cases hand-to-hand. There were a number of bayonet wounds reported at the hospitals. He says nothing about the slaughter of his own men. We had an idea that we were doing some slaughte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ng. There was great rejoicing on the part of the soldiers at again meeting their comrades, from whom they had been separated three days. The regiment was halted about sunrise and breakfast was prepared, after which the march was continued to Amelia Courthouse, Va., where the night was spent. The enemy next morning attacked and began burning the wagon-train, but were driven off. The retreat was continued, the rear guard having frequent fights with the enemy. On Friday, April 7, 1865, Farmville, Va., was reached, and Scales' brigade relieved Cook's brigade as rear guard of the infantry. The enemy having crossed the river, pressed the lines very hard and consequently the rear guard was engaged in several attacks and suffered severely. The enemy was driven off, and this was the last fighting in which the regiment was engaged before the surrender. Saturday, April 8th, the regiment camped about three miles from Appomattox Courthouse, Va. As Appomattox Courthouse was approached the