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three of his brothers, who had been in the Eighth North-Carolina regiment, were on the island in civil costume. Such are they! To whomsoever is king they are ready to bow. In the medical department of the rebel forces several prisoners were made. Among them are Dr. Walter Coles, Surgeon-in-chief of the post. Dr. Coles was two years resident physician to Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Busby, of Raleigh, N. C., and his assistant, Dr. A. T. Gordon, of the Wise Legion. Dr. R. H. Worthington, Murfreesboro, of the Thirty-first North-Carolina regiment. These gentlemen said they had about twenty-five wounded in all, in their hospital. Lieut. S. C. Kinney, of Staunton, Va., an officer of the engineeer corps, was also among the prisoners at this house. The wounded rebels were carried about two miles to the rear, to a farm-house on the eastern shore, at Shallowbag Bay. The following were among the number: O. Jennings Wise, captain in the Fifty-ninth Virginia regiment, (Wise's Legi
erms had not, at the latest advices, been submitted to the Union commander. Gen. Johnston informed the citizens that he should be compelled to evacuate the place on account of his inability to defend it with the force at his command, and Gen. Pillow subsequently made a speech to the public, in which he informed them that the army would fall back and endeavor to retrieve their losses from another point. On Sunday, the army evacuating Bowling Green passed through Nashville, en route for Murfreesboro, or some other locality in that vicinity — a heterogeneous mixture of artillery, cavalry, infantry, ambulances, wagons, and negroes, all worn down with their long forced march of eighty miles. The city is said to have been very unsound, and McClernand himself confessed that he was in daily receipt of information concerning the movements of our troops. Phosphorous and other inflammable compounds have since been found concealed ready for use, and it is also stated that a batch of Union
r o'clock P. M., on the fifteenth inst., with Col. Wood and a detachment of forty men, I left Murfreesboro for Gallatin, having learned that no Federal forces remained at that place. The chief objectest to the service. Our destination was kept secret, and the command having been sent from Murfreesboro in separate parties, by different roads, to unite at some distance from town, it was impossibat the enemy could be apprised of the movement until after the blow was struck. A citizen of Murfreesboro, whose zeal and loyalty is undoubted, made the necessary arrangements of runners to keep us pnd learning that our presence might have become known, we concluded to withdraw and return to Murfreesboro. We were made acquainted, just before reaching the town, that a body of Federal cavalry ha opportunity offering, we resumed our march, and, after travelling about sixty miles, reached Murfreesboro about two o'clock next morning. I have omitted to mention that before leaving Gallatin, th
McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, praying for confederate aid. In answer to their entreaties, Capts. McHenry and Bledsoe were sent up with two companies of Tennessee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wednesday, Capt. Hastings was within four miles of the place, with fifty Ohio cavalry, giving some attention to the railroad between McMinnville and Murfreesboro. Capt. McHenry, who commanded the confederates, will be remembered as Governor Harris's Adjutant, in command at this city last summer and fall. Capt. Hastings, who directed our little band, was a refugee from this place, and is in the quartermaster's department, I believe. When Capt. Hastings's presence was known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invincible pike-man, Judge Ridley, and Judg
McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, praying for confederate aid. In answer to their entreaties, Capts. McHenry and Bledsoe were sent up with two companies of Tennessee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wednesday, Capt. Hastings was within four miles of the place, with fifty Ohio cavalry, giving some attention to the railroad between McMinnville and Murfreesboro. Capt. McHenry, who commanded the confederates, will be remembered as Governor Harris's Adjutant, in command at this city last summer and fall. Capt. Hastings, who directed our little band, was a refugee from this place, and is in the quartermaster's department, I believe. When Capt. Hastings's presence was known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invincible pike-man, Judge Ridley, and Judg
entrating all my available forces at and around Corinth. Meanwhile, having called on the Governors of the States of Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana, to furnish additional troops, some of them, chiefly regiments from Louisiana, soon reached this vicinity, and with two divisions of Gen. Polk's command from Columbus, and a fine corps of troops from Mobile and Pensacola, under Maj.-Gen. Bragg, constituted the army of the Mississippi. At the same time, Gen. Johnston, being at Murfreesboro, on the march to form a junction of his forces with mine, was called on to send at least a brigade by railroad, so that we might fall on and crush the enemy should he attempt an advance from under his gunboats. The call on Gen. Johnston was promptly complied with. His entire force was also hastened in this direction, and by the first of April our united forces were concentrated along the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, from Bethel to Corinth, and on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, from C
ormed in splendid line of battle. The cavalry looked magnificent, and came dashing along in splendid style. They got within three hundred yards of us, before they discovered their mistake, and then the artillery told them of it. The canister was poured into them, and away they went in every imaginable direction — infantry and cavalry mixed in one conglomerated mass of frightened and flying humanity. The cavalry was sent in pursuit, when they had got out of artillery range, and the prisoners were being sent in every hour, until I lay down to try to sleep. This morning I find we have killed and wounded seventy-two, and taken three hundred and fifty prisoners, and two pieces of artillery. Gen. Mitchel has entire possession of the railroads from Bridgeport, ten miles east of Stevenson, west to Huntsville, thence south to Decatur, north to Athens, and in a month will have the railroad lines running to Nashville, via Columbia, from Decatur, and via Murfreesboro from Stevenson.