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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 166 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 110 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 74 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 61 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 60 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 58 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 48 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) or search for Natchitoches (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
pied the town, Taylor having retired toward Natchitoches and called in Mouton's division from the coore the advance of the columns ascending the Red River and the Teche under A. J. Smith and Franklin miles above Alexandria and forty-six below Natchitoches. After the arrival of Lee's cavalry, A. J.turned to Alexandria and Taylor withdrew to Natchitoches. While the navy was occupied in passing April the whole force was concentrated near Natchitoches, the gun-boats and the twenty-six transporty at Pleasant Hill, thirty-three miles from Natchitoches, and A. J. Smith a day's march in their reaarching twice crosses the western arm of the Red River, called Cane River, the second time at Monette's Ferry, thirty-six miles below Natchitoches. Here Bee, with four brigades and four batteries, hhis dam, the river Map and sections of the Red River dams above Alexandria. was 758 feet wide, wSmith had then just entered the mouth of the Red River, but as yet Kirby Smith neither knew nor exp[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
The navy in the Red River. by Thomas O. Selfridge, Captain, U. S. N. The Red River expedition was essentially a movement of the Army of Red River expedition was essentially a movement of the Army of the Gulf to control more thoroughly Louisiana and eastern Texas, in which Admiral Porter was called upon to cooperate with the naval forces os purpose, early in March, 1864, he assembled at the mouth of the Red River the ironclads Eastport, Essex, Benton, Lafayette, Choctaw, Chillits. On the 12th of March the fleet and transports moved up the Red River. The greater part turned off at the Atchafalaya to cover the lanrt De Russy was captured by the navy in the first movement up the Red River in May, 1863, but was afterward abandoned when the army marched ton stopped by this seemingly impassable barrier, the falls of the Red River? At this critical moment Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey, chiefadron and transports reached the Mississippi. And thus ended the Red River expedition, one of the most humiliating and disastrous that had t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
y east of the Ouachita was directed to fall back toward Natchitoches, and subsequently to oppose, as far as possible, the ads might be crippled or destroyed. Banks pushed on to Natchitoches. It was expected he would be detained there several dag supplies. Steele on the Little Missouri and Banks at Natchitoches were but about one hundred miles from Shreveport or Marcountry did not admit of their forming a junction above Natchitoches, and if they advanced I hoped, by refusing one of them,ce his infantry across the barren country lying between Natchitoches and Mansfield. I returned to Shreveport and wrote GeneThe construction of the dam, aided by a temporary rise in Red River, enabled Admiral Porter to get his fleet over the falls. andria on the 12th and 13th of May, the fleet quitted the Red River, and the campaign ended with the occupation of all the coell as of the lower Teche. The operations of Taylor on Red River and Marmaduke on the Mississippi prevented A. J. Smith fr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
e tin-clad Rodolph on April 1st. A fortnight later, immediately after the surrender of Mobile, the gun-boat Sciota was lost in the same way, as were also the tugs Ida and Althea, and a launch belonging to the Cincinnati. These disasters resulted in a loss of 23 killed and 32 wounded. In the Mississippi squadron, now under the command of Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, the last months were chiefly occupied in convoy duty and keeping up communication on the Mississippi, in blockading the Red River, and in active operations in conjunction with the army by the fleets on the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, the former under Lieutenant-Commander Shirk and the latter under Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. Both these officers displayed great energy and resource in an exacting and difficult service, and they were ably seconded by the volunteer officers who commanded the light gun-boats in frequent and hotly contested engagements with the Confederate batteries and troops on the banks. The la