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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 205 205 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 134 124 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 102 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 97 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 83 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 67 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) or search for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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inety-six prisoners and nine pieces of artillery. His loss was ninety killed, four hundred and seventy-eight wounded, and nine missing. In March, the rebel General Pettigrew, with a large force of infantry and artillery, made a demonstration on Newbern, but was forced to abandon the attempt on that place. General Foster's loss was only two killed and four wounded. In April, General Hill laid siege to Washington, on Tar River. The place had only a small garrison, and was but slightly fortified. General Foster, however, immediately directed all his energies to strengthen the works so as to resist any assault till reinforcements arrived from Newbern, to raise the siege there. No report of the losses on either side. An expedition sent against a rebel camp at Gum Swamp, in May, which captured one hundred and sixty-five prisoners and military stores, and another, in July, against Rocky Mount, on Tar River, which destroyed the bridge at that place and a large amount of rebel propert
Doc. 69.-attack on Newbern, N. C. General Palmer's despatch. Newbern, N. C., February 1, Newbern, N. C., February 1, 8 o'clock P. M. early this morning our outposts at Bachelor's Creek were attacked by the enemy, rrong force of the enemy operating in front of Newbern for the last ten days, and no reenforcements Already you are aware of the attack made upon Newbern early last week, and the subsequent details ols are concentrated about nine miles west of Newbern. Up to the hour when the Patuxent left NewbeNewbern, no reenforcements had arrived in the department, notwithstanding that a despatch was sent to Foour side during last week's operations before Newbern, is about one thousand five hundred prisonerssession of the outer line of fortifications. Newbern is the key to a large and productive country,at General Pickett found the enemy's works at Newbern too strong to carry by assault, and has retirssful foraging expedition. The defences of Newbern are certainly of the most formidable descript[8 more...]
e glare of great events, may be unnoted, or, at best, only recorded in a brief paragraph. When the attack was made on Newbern, on the second of February last, company F, of the Second regiment North-Carolina Union volunteers, was stationed at Beach Grove, the extreme outpost from Newbern. When it became evident that the position could not be held against the overwhelming force of rebels, which was rapidly approaching, the men of this company, having the certainty of an ignominious death before them if they should be captured, proposed to the officer in command to pilot the force at the outpost in safety to Newbern, by paths through the woods known only to themselves. But unfortunately, they were temporarily in charge of officers not mechanic, (a machinist,) having been pressed into the rebel service, managed to make his escape from Wilmington, and at Newbern enlisted in the Second regiment. After a few weeks, he contrived to convey the information to his wife, who resided som
us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past of foreign countries need not be sought unto to furnish illustrations of the heritage of shame that subjugation would entail. Baltimore, St. Louis, Nashville, Knoxville, New-Orleans, Vicksburgh, Huntsville, Norfolk, Newbern, Louisville, and Fredericksburgh are the first fruits of the ignominy and poverty of Yankee domination. The sad story of the wrongs and indignities endured by those States which have been in the complete or partial possession of the enemy, will give the best evidence of the consequences of subjugation. Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to-day a smoking ruin and the theatre of the most revolting cruelties and barbarisms. The minions of tyranny consume
t: Headquarters of the army, and District of North-Carolina, Newbern, Northcarolina, Feb. 11, 1864. Major-General Pickett, Department omond Examiner, February eighth, 1864. It is styled The advance on Newbern, and appears to have been extracted from the Petersburgh Register,n, and hanged after the action at Thomuasville. The advance on. Newbern.--The Petersburgh Register gives the following additional facts of the advance on Newbern: Our army, according to the report of passengers arriving from Weldon, has fallen back to a point sixteen miles west of Newbern. The reason assigned for this retrograde movement was that Newbern could not be taken by us without a loss on our part which wouNewbern could not be taken by us without a loss on our part which would find no equivalent in its capture, as the place was stronger than we had anticipated. Yet, in spite of this, we are sure that the expedituary 16, 1864. Major-General John J. Peck, U. S. A., Commanding at Newbern: General: Your communication of the eleventh of February is rec