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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 205 205 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 134 124 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 102 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 97 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 83 39 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 79 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 67 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) or search for New Bern (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
d of Fort Hatteras, very much exhausted from exposure and hard fighting the previous day. He says: The garrison had hoped for the arrival of a regiment from Newbern the previous night, which would have been employed in an attempted assault of Fort Clark, held by the Union troops, the appearance of bad weather having caused th Roanoke Island, and thus lost the key to our interior coast; and we failed to furnish General Branch with a reasonable force, and thus lost the important town of Newbern. On consultation with Flag-Officer Stringham and Commander Stellwagen, General Butler determined to leave the troops and hold the fort until he could get some ing the winter months. From it offensive operations may be made upon the whole coast of North Carolina to Bogue Inlet, extending many miles inland to Washington, Newbern, and Beaufort. In the language of the chief-engineer of the rebels, Colonel Thompson, in an official report, it is the key of the Albemarle. In my judgment, it
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. Rowan left Hatteras Inlet with the flotilla under his command, at 7.30 A. M. of the 12th of March, 1862, accompanied by the army transports carrying twelve thousand troops intended to be employed At sunset of the same day the flotilla anchored off Slocum's Neck, fifteen miles distant and within sight of the city of Newbern. The following vessels composed the attacking force; Delaware, Lieutenant-Commanding L. P. Quackenbush, and flag-shipnumber to the Union troops. Only 200 were captured, but a very large amount of army equipage and supplies were found at Newbern. Our casualties were 88 killed and 352 wounded Those of the Confederates are not known. On the 25th of April the Unihe Monticello. At daylight on the morning of March 14th a large Confederate force attacked Fort Anderson (opposite Newbern, N. C.), on the river Neuse. It was an unfinished work, garrisoned by 300 men. Its defence was aided by the gunboats Hetzel
m original returns now in the war Department, Washington, D. C. Date.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Commanding general. September, 1861, Dirt, of Pamlico9,01610,743Brigadier-General R. C. Gatlin, to March 19, 1862, October 31, 1861, Newbern8,239 January 31, 1862, in North Carolina6,29012,095 Total enlisted men. March 31, 1862, in North Carolina10,37224,300 April 19, 1862, in North Carolina17,947 Effective total.22,068Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Anderson, from Mch. 19. 1862, to May 86525,29029,86329,863 January 31, 186524,95630,06230,062 IX.—names of vessels, officers commanding them, and armaments in the attack of the Defences on Roanoke Island, February 7 and 8, 1860, and operations following at Elizabeth City and Newbern in which many of these vessels were engaged. Name of vessel.Commanders of vessels.Armament. Stars and StripesLieut.-Commanding Reed Werden4 Viii-in., 1 30-pdr. rifle. LouisianaLieut.-Commanding Alex. Murray1 Viii-in., 3 32-pdrs., 1 12-
et seq. Mahaska, the, 131, 146 et seq. Mahopac, the, 221, 229 Malvern, the, 231 Maple Leaf, the, U. S. transport, 146 Maps: Roanoke Island, 180; Newbern, 191 Maratanza, the, 218, 228, 242 Marblehead, the, U. S. vessel, 71, 129 et seq., 145 Marchand, Commander, 67 Marion, the, U. S. transport, 49 aval attack, plan of, 232 Negroes, rejoicing at Beaufort, 34 et seq.; desolation of, at Hutchinson's Island, 37 et seq.; as spies, 43 Nereus, the, 228 Newbern, 189 et seq. Newbury, Taylor C., 80 New Hampshire, regiment of: Fourth, 46, 59 New Ironsides, the, U. S. vessel, 83, 91 et seq., 96, 100, 104 et seq., 10ssaw Sound, 117, 122, 162 (note) Rogers, Ensign, 150 Rowan, Captain S. C., 128, 137, 146, 165, 172, 177, 179; at Roanoke Island, 182 et seq., 185 et seq.; at Newbern, 189 et seq. S. Sabine, the, U. S. frigate, 6, 17 St. Andrew's Inlet, 48 et seq. St. Augustine, Fla., surrendered to Captain Rodgers, 55 et seq., 59