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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Whittier and the Alabama planter.--On Monday, the New England Poet, John G. Whittier, passed a few hours here on the way to his lovely home on the banks of the Merrimac, whence he has given to the world so many ringing lyrics and striking poems, stirring the blood like the blast of a trumpet, redolent of the airs of freedom, or tender with the emotions of friendship, charmingly descriptive of New England home life, or graphically embodying our quaint local legends and sturdy historical tradNew England home life, or graphically embodying our quaint local legends and sturdy historical traditions. He returns from a brief visit to the Wachusett Hills, improved in health, to resume his pen, we trust, and add still further to the rich stores of American literature which he has already adorned so much. Mr. Whittier manifests a deep interest in the cause of the country, and watches with an anxious eye the course of events. We have heard, on reliable authority, an incident with which he was connected, resulting in a singular interview. The story is substantially this: A few month
23. Rhode Island to the South. by Gen. F. W. Lander. Once on New England's bloody heights, And o'er a Southern plain, Our fathers fought for sovereign rights, That working men might reign. And by that only Lord we serve, The great Jehovah's name; By those sweet lips that ever nerve High hearts to deeds of fame; By all that makes the man a king, The household hearth a throne-- Take back the idle scoff ye fling, Where freedom claims its own. For though our battle hope was vague Upon Manassas' pkes the man a king, The household hearth a throne-- Take back the idle scoff ye fling, Where freedom claims its own. For though our battle hope was vague Upon Manassas' plain, Where Slocum stood with gallant Sprague, And gave his life in vain; Before we yield the holy trust Our old forefathers gave, Or wrong New England's hallowed dust, Or grant the wrongs ye crave-- We'll print in kindred gore so deep The shore we love to tread, That woman's eyes shall fail to weep O'er man's unnumbered dead.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), South Carolina Thirty years ago. (search)
ation, the following beautiful ode was chanted by a full choir: Hail, our country's natal morn! Hail, our spreading kindred born! Hail, thou banner, not yet torn! Waving o'er the free! While this day in festive throng, Millions swell the patriot's song, Shall we not the note prolong? Hallowed jubilee! Who would sever Freedom's shrine? Who would draw the invidious line? Though by birth one spot be mine, Dear is all the rest-- Dear to me the South's fair land; Dear the central mountain band, Dear New England's rocky strand, Dear the prairied West. By our altars pure and free, By our laws' deep-rooted tree, By the past's dread memory, By our Washington-- By our common kindred tongue! By our hopes-bright, buoyant, young, By the tie of country strong, We will still be one. Fathers! have ye bled in vain? Ages, must you droop again? Maker, shall we rashly stain, Blessings sent by Thee? No! receive our solemn vow, While before thy throne we bow, Ever to maintain as now, “Union--Liberty!
olony, a milder climate was desirable; in view of a settlement at the South, De Monts explored and colonized for France, the rivers, the coasts, and the bays of New England, so far, at least, as Cape Cod. The numbers and hostility of the savages led him to delay a removal, since his colonists were so few. Yet the purpose remained.fifty years later, is one of those curious coincidences in which the muse of history loves to indulge. If the first had succeeded in his efforts to possess the New England shores, who can tell what would have been the effect upon the destinies of this continent? If the second had failed in entering Port Royal harbor, how differeness the New England shores, who can tell what would have been the effect upon the destinies of this continent? If the second had failed in entering Port Royal harbor, how differently the future annals of the Republic might read! If Port Royal menaced New England in 1605, the tables have been turned in 1861.--Philadelphia Press.
and proceed across the Atlantic would not have been adventured. The taking out of Confederate naval officers, wherewith to supply commanders for first-class frigates to be purchased in Europe, does not seem a perfectly satisfactory explanation. Those who know Captain Pegram would not be surprised to hear of any brilliant achievement being performed by him, of which the Nashville is capable, before he reports himself again to the Navy Department in this city. If the good people of some New England seaport town should wake up one of these fine mornings, and find their homes in flames, they may console themselves with reading of the exploits of one John Paul Jones of the long, long ago. It is now Thursday evening. Last week at the same time I felt very well assured that before set of sun to-day great events would have happened all around and very near us. Yet every thing is quiet as before at the critical points on the border. Not a word more of the 40,000 Yankees that landed at