hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 56 results in 8 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
placard intended to renew the scenes of October, 1833; in the last week, participating in the New England Anti-Slavery Convention in Boston, and, at the very close, holding in Julien Hall a debate Lnied Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Child despite the remonstrances of his friends, his first test of the New England temper after the signal had been given from Faneuil Hall proved how much it had changed for to preach in the latter year. He was settled till 1833 at West Newbury, Mass. He joined the New England A. S. Society in May, 1835, and first met Mr. Garrison on Nov. 6, 1835. See his Autobiographawyer to his informant, Ellis Ames (Mass. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, 18.343). The editor of the New England Galaxy overheard a justice of the peace remark: I hope they will catch him [Garrison] and tarve surpassed this invention for putting the mob in the wrong. The religious press, except the New England Spectator and Zion's Herald (Methodist), was in accord with the secular. The Christian Watch
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
our Union? . . . The right of free and safe locomotion from one part of the land to the other is denied to us, except on peril of our lives! . . . Therefore it is, I assert, that the Union is now virtually dissolved. . . . Look at McDuffie's sanguinary message! Read Calhoun's Report to the U. S. Senate, authorizing every postmaster in the South to plunder the mail of such Northern letters or newspapers as he may choose to think incendiary! Sir, the alternative presented to the people of New England is this—they must either submit to be gagged and fettered by Southern taskmasters, or labor unceasingly for the removal of slavery from our country. . . . In Massachusetts, a colored citizen stands on the same equality with the Governor of the State. He is entitled to vote, and may be elected to fill any office in the gift of the people. No slaveholding State, therefore, can legislate against his rights, any more than against the rights of Mr. Webster or Mr. Everett, without violatin
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
ition from the general political use of the New England meeting-house, since the days when the chur on Anti-slavery Measures, published in the New England Spectator of August 2, and bearing the signin behalf of the Lib. 7.139. great body of New England abolitionists, though many of the thirty-niion. You may tell them that the Friends in New England are fast ceasing to be abolitionists ex offGarrison, not only in Massachusetts, but in New England, which was largely represented at Worcesterute, that the clergy, as a body, whether in New England or out of it, have always been most implacaer! . . . Can the orthodox abolitionists of New England continue to go with Mr. Garrison? Not if h endurance of suffering innocence; that, in New England, all organized opposition to our cause has n regard to the murder . . . of a native of New England and citizen Lib. 7.198. of the free State stration, of which the dearest interests of New England will be the first victims, and of which the[5 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
city when the building is burnt by a mob. At the New England Convention in Boston, his views as to the equalit3, 1844), Emerson, in a discourse criticising the New England Reformers, held up an ideal which was like nothind with a coat of tar-and-feathers. How was it in New England as the truth began to affect the consciences of tare less prevalent here than they were in distant New England ( History of Pennsylvania Hall, p. 71). When she1840. Thanks to his prompt action on May 24, the New England Anti-Slavery Convention met without disturbance aon St. Clair, instructing them to memorialize the New England ecclesiastical bodies to bear their testimony aga3 from Rhode Island, about a dozen from the other New England States, and three from Pennsylvania. They showeday afternoon, we formed a society, calling it the New England Non-resistance Society, and electing Effingham L.labor more faithfully for the purification of the New England churches. Our abolitionists have generally been
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
o draw from), and more than all the rest of New England, with Pennsylvania into the bargain. Owingan of a new paper, and, ever since the late New England Convention, had been the chief intriguer foning his protest at the last Ante, p. 220. New England Convention; and of Orange Scott's, to strikers and limitations to the cause. At the New England A. S. Convention in 1837, writes Mrs. Chapmn pamphlet form. Boyle ought to be here in New England, editing a paper that shall cause every sechode Island, and Pennsylvania, and with the New England Convention. Tappan and Torrey gave notice early period. It was not till after the New England Convention—the scene of the next engagementof our committee inviting him to attend the New England Convention. He is in a sad state of mind. 1, 94. 1839, three hundred delegates to the New England Convention assembled in Boston. The woman by Charles K. Whipple, the Treasurer of the New England Non-Resistance Society, and by H. C. Wright[2 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 6: the schism.—1840. (search)
agents, dispose of its organ, and shut up the office in New York City. At the annual meeting in May, Garrison and his New England supporters outnumber the partisans of the Executive Committee, and recover control of the Parent Society. A secessionower.— Vide Natural history of spiritual Despotism. The wit of Collins found a way to forward the largest possible New England delegation to New York. On May 2, 1840, James C. Jackson wrote from New York to G. W. Benson: J. A. Collins wise proportion of them were members of orthodox churches. Seth Sprague was among the most prominent Methodist laymen in New England. (Probably another hundred went by other routes.) There never has been such a mass of ultraism afloat, in one boat, si friend Seth Sprague, through ripened manhood down to rosy youth. They were, indeed, the moral and religious élite of New England abolitionism, who have buckled on the anti-slavery armor to wear to the end of the conflict, or to the close of life.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
or their deliverance, than elsewhere, though basking in the sunshine of favor. I said I was glad to be in Boston once more. I am—though Boston has, it is true, used me somewhat roughly, in days that are past. I am—for here I see once more the people. In England I have seen dukes, and marquises, and earls, and royalty itself, in all the hereditary splendor of an ancient monarchy, surrounded with luxury and pomp, and the people impoverished and oppressed to sustain it all; but here, in New England, one looks for such inequality in vain. Yet I have had no reason personally to speak ill of the nobility. I have to make grateful acknowledgment of much kindness and attention from them. But I want to see them invested in their own nobility alone. I want them to be the noblemen of nature. But here are the people! And oh, how would my heart leap if my thoughts might stop here. True, there are here no such institutions, civil or ecclesiastical, as there weigh heavily on the peopl
Rev., letter on non-resistance, 2.286; wanted in New England, 287. Boyle, Laura P., 2.287. Bradburn, GeorgD. C., 108, and circulates it, 110, denounces its New England opponents in Congress, 111; devotion to temperanc Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (successor of New England A. S. S. after 1835), hearing before Legislature, New Bedford (Mass.), color prejudice, 1.253. New England Anti-Slavery Convention, shut out of halls, 2.105ued under name of Mass. A. S. S., which see.) New England Galaxy, 2.35. New England Spectator, see SpectNew England Spectator, see Spectator. New England Weekly Review, edited by G. D. Prentice, 1.115, 183, by Whittier, 183. New Hampshire, LNew England Weekly Review, edited by G. D. Prentice, 1.115, 183, by Whittier, 183. New Hampshire, Legislative resolves on A. S. agitation, 2.76. New Hampshire Observer, 2.112. New Haven (Conn.), rejects ced with Lafayette's, 435, 503; first speech, 451; New England tour and mobs, 452, 516-520, 2.2-4, 6; shut out os, 126; writes to Clay on G.'s behalf, 190; edits New England Weekly Review, 183, 273; home in Haverhill, 331,