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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
onvention's infidel character and Mr. Garrison's complicity. This he first ventilated in the New England Christian Advocate, Edited in Lowell, Mass., by the Rev. Luther Lee. and Lib. 11.79. thengazing upward at the mist-clad mountains, that if ever we lived to get home again to our dear New England, we would go and show him New Hampshire's sterner and loftier summits, her Haystacks and her es. Yet a like resolution from his hand was staved off at the closely Lib. 11.90. following New England Convention, under the lead of May 25, 1841. William Chace, who had imbibed most deeply what obbed for words actually spoken in public. Certain strongly marked individualities among the New England field agents of the era succeeding the schism fall under the description just given negativelth them. In details of language, of policy, he was free to differ from them. Thus, at the New England Convention in May, 1841, May 25. Mr. Garrison's resolution in regard to the church read as f
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
decided majority in its favor, but no action was deemed advisable, and no vote was attempted. Many of the participants returned to renew the discussion at the New England Convention in Boston. Henry C. Wright was May 24-26, 1842. ready with fresh resolutions, offered on behalf of the business committee: Resolved, That th107, 114. campaigns in Maine, New Hampshire, and various parts of Massachusetts. His adventures in the Mohawk Valley and beyond—the beautiful region settled by New England emigrants, and popularly known as the West even down to the date of this narrative—are related in the following letters, which give a glimpse of the bright and he particulars. Up to this hour, I have enjoyed myself far beyond my expectations. The spirit of hospitality, in this section, exceeds anything to be found in New England, with comparatively rare exceptions. Money is about as scarce as gold dust, but there is no lack of food and the other necessaries of life, and to these you ar
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
aveholders!—1844. The American Anti-slavery Society and the New England Convention formally adopt Garrison's disunion doctrine, not withd in it for several years. He belongs to one of the best of our New England families (in the Old World sense of good family—hereditary genti us. The last battle-ground of the disunion doctrine was the New England Anti-Slavery Convention, whose sessions began in the Marlboroa Lib. 14: 91. May. Quincy thus epitomized it for Webb: The New England Convention was the best one we ever Ms. June 14, 1844. had — thtions. But those that remained were la creme de la creme of the New England Abolitionists, and stood for the very bone and muscle of the caue Ministers and Members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the New England and New Hampshire Conferences,] can now present myself its stern were unblushingly retracting them. The Democratic press of the New England and Middle States had as a body gone over to the Administration <
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
there been a more signal occasion for impressing upon the popular conscience the national guilt towards slavery; the abolition corps was already weakened by the absence of Wright, Douglass, and Buffum. Could the chief himself be spared? The New England Convention first, and afterwards the Executive Lib. 16.90, 98. Committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society, unanimously answered yes, and a call for funds was immediately made. There remained the editorial conduct of the Liberator, of whire the closing of the mail for Boston, with pen in hand to send you a few words of greeting, with assurances of my health, which never fails to be excellent in this climate. The climate of Old England is much more congenial to me than that of New England. It affects my voice and lungs much more to give one lecture here than it did to deliver half-a-dozen abroad (Ms. Boston, Mar. 1, 1847, W. L. G. to H. C. Wright). My cheeks are quite ruddy, and I have little doubt that, on my return home, y
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
the counties of Philadelphia, Chester, Lancaster, and a portion of Dauphin, and, through the whole distance, saw but a single spot that reminded us of our rocky New England. Arriving at 3 o'clock, we found at the depot, Aug. 7. awaiting our coming, Dr. Rutherford, an old subscriber to the W. W. Rutherford. Liberator, and his sisreception has been very kind. The manners of the people are primitive and simple. The country, of course, looks like a newly settled one, as compared with our New England States, but it is comparatively thickly settled on this Western Reserve. In regard to contributing money towards carrying forward our cause, they are not so ld admitted the existence of slave representation under the Constitution by declaring the three-fifths allowance unrepublican, and demanding its abrogation. The New England delegation went in a body for Hale of New Hampshire, J. P. Hale. already the Presidential nominee of his own select little Lib. 17.186. party of Independent D
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ill, I will do what I can. Sometimes I have thought that hitherto, amid the fierce this-worldliness of N. E., nothing New England. but superstition would keep [the people] (in their present low state) from perverting the Sunday yet worse by making of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbatarianism, he proposed a Lib. 14.110. New England Convention to discuss the Sabbath. Occurrences meanwhile, on both sides of the Atlantic, had made such a meeting seemlley-slaves row with what intent they would, he guided all things at his will. Lib. 18.53. For example, the Prince of New England infidelity, as the same paper styled him, successfully opposed such of Mr. Parker's resolutions as deprecated a Lib. ey to Lib. 18.50; Ms. Jan. 10, 1848, W. L. G. to E. M. Davis. support the operations of a Sabbath League. At home, a New England pro-slavery Sabbatarian press recoiled from the spectacle of the Rev. John G. Palfrey, a Massachusetts Representative
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
ve will be allowed to be seized, whether against law or in conformity thereto, on the soil of New England, to say nothing of the other free States, and hurried back to bondage. It would be at his pese, no attempt has been made to Ante, pp. 66-68. recapture a fugitive slave here. At the New England Anti-Slavery Convention on May 29, Edmund Quincy spoke to his own resolution couched in these words: Resolved, That it is our duty to agitate the question of slavery till the soil of New England is pure enough to free every man who sets foot upon it; and meanwhile, we pledge ourselves toh allows the slaveholder to hunt the fugitive slave through our borders, and not only to make New England, so far as in us lies, an asylum for the oppressed, but to proclaim the fact so loudly that tm-sellers, but Lib. 19.158. bearing heavily on the consciences of buyers and consumers. His New England harvest gathered in, he returned to New York, and straightway by word and deed justified Mr.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
ay. He held in his hand the text or notes of his discourse, which was not one prepared for the occasion, but had been Lib. 20.85. delivered in various parts of New England and well received. In a clear, ringing voice, he repeated it to his Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.199. hearers in the Tabernacle, fixing the attention of those who ity to withstand it. With esteem and sympathy, I am very truly thy friend, John G. Whittier. Boston would fain have aped New York in dealing with the New England Anti-Slavery Convention, which opened at the Melodeon on May 28, and closed in Faneuil Lib. 20.87. Hall on May 30. The New York Herald's namesake—as vile as . Henry Bibb. She may fail at first, but her efforts will be crowned with equal success. I have only to say, I bid you God-speed, women of Massachusetts and New England, in this good work! Whenever your convention shall meet, and wherever it shall be, I shall endeavor to be there, to forward so good, so glorious a movement.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
be a patriot, a lover of liberty, whether he fly from the banks of the Danube, the Seine, or the Tiber, let him go to New England, and find a home with the persecuted and maligned abolitionists of the country! Let him throw in his lot with them; l Webster's breast as perhaps no other treatment in his life had ever done; nor could the exclusion of the Lib. 21.83. New England Anti-Slavery Convention from the same hall, coincidently with his speech at Syracuse, bring him peace of mind. An effcknowledge Mr. Garrison's resolution of thanks Lib. 21.94. for his singularly well-timed visit, and of farewell, from New England abolitionists: I say, Mr. President, that I rejoice that I have been Lib. 21.94. permitted to mingle once againe first week in June, he closed his American tour. There remained the farewell soiree arranged for him by vote of the New England Convention, and held in Lib. 21.90. Boston on June 16 in the large hall over the Albany Lib. 21.98, 101. Railroad de
uth made his first speech in Faneuil Hall; and here at length his tongue was free to pronounce Lib. 22.73; Kossuth in New England, p. 82. the name of slavery, while nevertheless confirming his refusal to heed the poet Channing's exhortation: W. E. With incredible self-satirization he exclaimed: Cradle of American Liberty! —it is a great name; but Kossuth in New England, p. 87; Lib. 22.73. there is something in it which saddens my heart. You should not say, American Liberty. You shoullave Law, but the companion of Garrison, Phillips, and Quincy. But no, after a lament that he had come to Kossuth in New England, p. 91. America in the midst of a Presidential campaign, Kossuth continued: The second difficulty I have to contossuth has not yet done with his neutrality. I must beg leave to say a few words in that respect; the Kossuth in New England, p. 93. more, because I could not escape vehement attacks for not committing myself, even in that respect, with whate
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