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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 62 results in 11 document sections:

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Dr. James Walker, then professor at Cambridge, was easily the first preacher. King's Chapel, with Rev. Ephraim Peabody in the pulpit and worshippers of the best society in the pews, represented the churches. Channing, that finest product of New England, was no longer living, to temper with his moral enthusiasm social and commercial opinion, and to set forth in weekly ministrations his lofty ideal of humanity. In two Unitarian pulpits, those of James Freeman Clarke and F. D. Huntington, thstons, Hungers, Izards, and Rhetts. It is difficult to understand this deference to Southern planters now that the marvellous expansion of the West, during, the second half of this century, has displaced the South as the principal consumer of New England products, as well as the dominant power in American politics. These people had a keen sense of legality, sharpened at times by material interests. This made them faithful to law and government; but it also led them, at least once, to strai
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
s as well as Peace and Antislavery meetings. At this period the New England lyceum was in full vigor. It provided a course of lectures, usutowns and cities of Massachusetts, as well as in other places in New England. This service brought him into connection with the people of thtt, with a view to supplying a copy to every professional man in New England. It gives an account of the efforts of European governments and h Sumner had thus far appeared almost wholly before audiences in New England, he had become well known by his printed addresses in the Middleol at West Newton in 1846; the annual address in 1848 before the New England Society at Cincinnati, requested by Timothy Walker; the annual oe that they have found an advocate so learned and so eloquent in New England. Be assured, my dear sir, that, although a stranger, I have car political matters, added: Do let me say that there is no one in New England whose productions I have read with so much unalloyed pleasure.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
ouse, Hannibal Hamlin of Maine, Democrat, voted for the resolution; but another Democrat from New England, John P. Hale of New Hampshire, revolted from his party. With the latter also stood Preston onfronted by material sacrifices or a breach in the party. In this majority, particularly in New England, the influence of manufacturers and capitalists was dominant. With them the protective tarif the slave! God forbid that the lash of the slave-dealer should descend by any sanction from New England! God forbid that the blood which spurts from the lacerated, quivering flesh of the slave shou To George Sumner, November 30:— The spirit of Antislavery promises soon to absorb all New England. Massachusetts will never give her vote for another slaveholder. The cotton lords will interlled. That outrage caused an immense excitement where it took place, which finally spread to New England. The abduction of William Morgan—of that single citizen!—by the Free Masons of his own State<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
f delegates to be both a worthy and an available candidate. A small number of delegates from New England stood faithfully by Webster. The convention put forth no platform of principles and measuressembly distinguished for that loyalty to moral principle which has been the life and glory of New England. Finding no hall large enough, the multitude thronged upon the Common. The venerable Samueld said: The young man who hisses will regret it ere his hair turns gray. He can be no son of New England; her soil would spurn him. That rebuke restored quiet, and afterwards the speaker and those speech at Worcester in June, in which he mentioned the secret influence that went forth from New England, especially from Massachusetts, and contributed powerfully to Taylor's nomination, and in whirs and flesh-mongers of Louisiana and Mississippi, and the cotton-spinners and traffickers of New England; between the lords of the lash and the lords of the loom,—led to a correspondence with Nathan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
the renewal in any form of agitation upon the subject of slavery. Giddings's History of the Rebellion, pp 348, 349. Among the signers were Howell Cobb, H. S. Foote, A. H. Stephens, R. Toombs, and J. B. Thompson. The only Whig member from New England who signed this paper was Samuel A. Eliot, of Boston. Mr. Appleton, his successor, alone of the Massachusetts delegation, voted that the Compromise, including the Fugitive Slave law, was a final and permanent settlement. April 5, 1852. vol. II. pp. 473, 474. He voted April 11 against excluding the admission of California from the Compromise, a week after he had expressed himself in debate as in favor of her admission independently. This vote, in which he stood alone among New England senators, prevented the exclusion of California from the Compromise, and delayed by some months her admission. Boston Atlas, April 16, 1850. He supported the Texas boundary bill, putting forth as his chief ground for yielding to the pretensio
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
pinion, vol. II. p. 410. The Whig press of New England, with rare exceptions, condemned his unexpeas, March 16, June 17, stated the number of New England newspapers approving the speech as six againty disapproving it. The religious press in New England with one accord condemned it. The mercasubjugate for a time the moral sentiment of New England. He was defeated, killed, and now is detecor agitation. It has shocked the people of New England. . . . . I have had a pleasant day or two wed his permanent judgment in his History of New England, vol. v. .487, where he refers to those great men of New England who, in the three special crises of her history, abased themselves to take ts and unsettle the higher policy of Puritan New England than that of any man known in its history. bster) had received from him than from some New England Whig's. Boston Advertiser, Nov. 2, 1852.ngly the general feeling of Free Soilers in New England in favor of his selection among all who had
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
capital the Hungarian patriot proceeded to the South and West, and thence to New England, receiving in his progress honors such as had been accorded to no foreigner l columns. Meanwhile the Whig journals, which covered the State and most of New England with their daily issues, poured a volley of criticisms on Sumner whenever thhe session. He presented, May 26, a memorial from the Society of Friends in New England, asking for the repeal of the Fugitive Slave Act, and while explaining its pole reform life. A man of more rightful expectations than any of his age in New England spoke .hat peace address July 4. Perhaps he did not know then all he was sad by pleasant relations between him and Rusk. Three Democratic senators from New England—Bradbury, Toucey, and James—took occasion to express themselves against Sumnhe Fugitive Slave law on that day were Hamilton Fish, and four senators from New England,—John H. Clarke, Hamlin, Truman Smith, and Upham. It is difficult at this d<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
ll demanded by the occasion,—this speech of New England's foremost orator contained nothing. Not wclergymen of all denominations and sects in New England, solemnly protesting, in the name of Almigh which had been heaped on the clergymen of New England. His constituents, as well as the clericale testimony of the morality and religion of New England against the Nebraska project. The Congre began several remonstrances, chiefly from New England clergymen, which had been intended for the ng, but with the liberties of the country. New England for a long time was governed by their prayesitiveness on two points,—the action of the New England ministers, whom he accused of hypocriticallnted his speeches. As a vindication of the New England clergy by a New England senator, without reNew England senator, without reserve or apology, it was the discharge of a duty which his colleague had left unperformed; and fromon was Anniversary Week, when the people of New England, especially their spiritual leaders, were a[7 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
eptember, and founding Lawrence, a town afterwards so celebrated. During the next spring the New England Emigrant Aid Company, formed under a Massachusetts charter, succeeded to the conduct of the eed his purpose to visit Washington in order to confer with Sumner as to the operations of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote: It is quite apparent that no one there who has attempted to defes wherever they may wander in the earth. . . . Let Mr. Sumner hear that every man of worth in New England loves his virtues; that every mother thinks of him as the protector of families; that every f? The day has come we have all hoped and labored for,—the day of something like unanimity in New England. Wilson wrote, January 19: What a change here since you took your seat in 1851! And what a materials, particularly on wool, which Was strongly urged at the time by the manufacturers of New England,—a further purpose of the modification being to reduce the revenue of the government, then yi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
void all walling; but I have got beyond this now. Imagine my happiness at being able again to move about without pain or any considerable fatigue. But there is still a something lurking in the system which must be eradicated, and my physician prescribes a course of baths and medicines. For this purpose I went to Dieppe, but soon became dissatisfied. There was water enough, but no libraries or books, and I at once left for London. . . . At Paris I found Palfrey's book, History of New England. which I read at once with great interest; it is admirable in all respects. Dana's book To Cuba and Back. I hear of in the hands of his London friends. I fund Lady Cranworth much pleased with it. Lord Stanhope finds his old friend W. Irving's Life of Washington very poor,— entirely unworthy of the subject and of the author. The Life of John Adams he recognizes as a very different work, and of positive merit. I hear of Seward's visit, but have not yet seen him. Since I have been in
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