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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, The New world and the New book (search)
ich gallery Bret Harte added the gambler, and the authors of Democracy and the Bread-Winners flung in the politician. In all these figures social distinctions disappear: a man's a man for a‘ that. And so of our later writers, Miss Wilkins in New England, Miss Murfree in Tennessee, Mr. Cable in Louisiana, Mr. Howe in Kansas, Dr. Eggleston in Indiana, Julien Gordon in New York, all represent the same impulse; all recognize that all men are created equal in Jefferson's sense, because all recognien power drawing him on to Rome, so Howells has evidently felt a magnet drawing him on to New York, and it was not until he set up his canvas there that it had due proportions. My friend Mr. James Parton used to say that students must live in New England, where there were better libraries, but that loafers and men of genius should live in New York. To me personally it seems a high price to pay for the privileges either of genius or of loafing, but it is well that Howells has at last paid it
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, III (search)
t is not strange, on such a method, that Maine should inform us that the majority of the present State governments were formed before the Union, and that only half the original thirteen colonies held slaves. So Mr. John A. Doyle, writing an extended history of American colonization, put into his first volume a map making the lines of all the early grants run north and south instead of east and west; and this having been received with polite incredulity, gave us another map depicting the New England colonies in 1700, with Plymouth still delineated as a separate government, although it had been united with Massachusetts eight years before. When a lady in a London drawing-room sends, by a returning New Yorker, an urgent message to her cousin at Colorado Springs, we rather enjoy it, and call it only pretty Fanny's way; she is not more ignorant of North American geography than we ourselves may be of that of South America. But when we find that English scholars of established reputati
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VIII (search)
he individual. It all comes to this, then, that for the development of individuality you must have a free career; and the guarantee of freedom is the first step toward what you seek. Nowhere will you find a more racy personality than among New England farmers, whose fathers lived before them on the same soil, or perhaps six generations of ancestors, and who, among all restrictions of hard soil and severe competition, have yet kept their separate characteristics. I have spent summer after slike—two who would not, even if drawn by an unsympathetic though acute observer like Howells, stand out on the canvas with as marked an individuality as Silas Lapham. It is so with our native-born population generally. In the best volume of New England stories ever written—it is perhaps needless to say that I refer to Five Hundred Dollars a Year and Other Stories, by Mr. H. W. Chaplin—there is an inimitable scene in a jury-room where the hero, Eli, holds out during many hours for the innocen<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, X (search)
and when one was gravely asked whether he preferred Tennyson to Sterling or Trench or Alford or Faber or Milnes. It is to me one of the most vivid reminiscences of my Harvard College graduation (in 1841) that, having rashly ventured upon a commencement oration whose theme was Poetry in an Unpoetical Age, I closed with an urgent appeal to young poets to lay down their Spenser and Tennyson, and look into life for themselves. Prof. Edward T. Channing, then the highest literary authority in New England, paused in amazement with uplifted pencil over this combination of names. You mean, he said, that they should neither defer to the highest authority nor be influenced by the lowest? When I persisted, with the zeal of seventeen, that I had no such meaning, but regarded them both as among the gods, he said good-naturedly, Ah! that is a different thing. I wish you to say what you think. I regard Tennyson as a great calf, but you are entitled to your own opinion. The oration met with m
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XIX (search)
y American community, for these classes are, whether Protestants or Catholics, not yet very remote from the time when they reverenced their clergy, and when this body represented leadership in all the walks of life. Among the Puritans, as is well known, the colleges existed to train clergymen, and the clergy existed to fill all the posts of leadership. There was no separate legal profession, for instance; and Chief Justice Sewall—whose racy journals make him the more sombre Pepys of the New England Colonial period—was educated for the ministry and took a seat on the bench by way of collateral pursuit, precisely as he accepted the command of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company and paraded with it on the Boston Common. Professor Goodale, the Harvard botanist, has lately shown that the beginnings of natural science in the curriculum of that institution were due to the fact, that being organized for the rearing of Christian ministers it must give them some knowledge of anatomy
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXV (search)
nce, with the habitual American courtesy to women in travelling,—a thing unparalleled in any European country, and of which, even in this country, Howells finds his best type in the Californian. What comes nearest to it among the Latin races is the courtesy of the high-bred gentleman toward the lady who is his social equal, which is a wholly different thing. A similar point of evolution in this country is the decorum of a public assembly. It is known that at the early town meetings in New England men sat with their hats on, as in England. Unconsciously, by a simple evolution of good manners, the practice has been outgrown in America; but Parliament still retains it. Many good results may have followed imperceptibly from this same habit of decorum. Thus Mr. Bryce points out that the forcible interruption of a public meeting by the opposite party, although very common in England, is very rare in America. In general, with us, usages are more flexible, more adaptive; in public meet