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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 8 document sections:

Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
s in prose and poetry in the Cambridge and Somerville papers. Mr. Flanagan attended the Unitarian church in this city, and wrote a number of prose essays for the meetings of the Unity Club. Selections from his writings were published after his death, under the title, Essays in Poetry and Prose. Among the prose essays is one containing curious information on Some Minor Poets of America. Another treats at length the career of Miss Kemble, the actor. A third describes the gray pine of New England. But the most original of the printed prose writings are the burlesque fables. These are whimsical in character, and point a moral, sometimes severe, as often gay. One of the very shortest is as follows—– XXXI.—the Ant and the Elephant. An Ant, meeting an Elephant, exclaimed: Sirrah! Fellow, one of us must turn out. One of us must indeed turn out, replied the Elephant, as he lifted his foot to advance. Whereupon the Ant ran nimbly to one side, and thus escaped crushing. I f<
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown School in the 17th century. (search)
the family must have lived here after his services as schoolmaster had ended. Benjamin Thompson has been styled by some the first native American poet. His versification was considered smooth and correct. Perhaps his most famous work was ‘New England's Crisis,’ a long poem on King Philip's War. November 16, 1674. ‘Mr. Thompson, having resigned up his charge in this town as schoolmaster ye 7 instant, this day ye Selectmen, with the advice and consent of the Reverend Mr. Thomas Shepard annual meeting in March, it was voted, if there should be a county school settled by the General Court, that this Town would raise £ 40, in order to provide for it, if it be settled in this town. Apparently nothing ever came of this. Neal's ‘New England,’ page 613, asserts that there was hardly a child of nine or ten years old throughout the whole country at this time but could read and write and say his catechism. If this be true, from the account which we have attempted to present, it
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex Canal. (search)
two capitals, and except that the canals did not effectually compete with the stages for carrying passengers, they held the same position to transportation as is now held by their successor and destroyer—the railroad. During the entire season of open river, from the time that the spring break — up of ice permitted navigation to commence until the frosts of fall again closed it, this eighty-five miles of water was thronged with boats taking the products of the country to a market and the New England metropolis, and returning loaded with salt, lime, cement, plaster, hardware, leather, liquors, iron, glass, grindstones, cordage, paints, oils and all the infinite variety of merchandise required by country merchants formerly classed under the general terms of ‘Dry West India goods.’ The construction of these canals was a great undertaking in that day. Boston was a town of only about 20,000. Neither Lowell nor Manchester had been commenced, and Nashua was a small place without manu
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown Schools in the 18th century. (search)
neration (£ 40) that was paid at the beginning of the previous century. We have shown how this amount fluctuated from time to time. On account of a varying income arising from the school fund, it is hard to determine always what was the yearly cost of the school. The master's salary sometimes included the rent of a house for his family; sometimes he was allowed to demand of his pupils a small tuition fee. Wood for the schoolhouse, in winter, was pretty generally supplied throughout all New England towns by the pupils' parents. The sum total of the master's earnings seems meagre enough, but we may believe that it averaged well with what was paid in neighboring communities. If the management of the school for a century showed but little change on its financial side, probably the same might be said of the curriculum of studies. There is no evidence that the school question was a very vital one. The requirements for entrance to Harvard College set the standard. Latin was general
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
e’ and ‘The Immortals’ contain the poems by which Mrs. Lowe will be remembered. The former includes verses that are the outcome of travels in Spain, when her brother was secretary of the American Legation at Madrid. It also includes poems of New England. Among the former is a vivid description of a Spanish bull-fight, closing with this address to the reigning princess:— Go, fair Infanta, dream Of bloody death to-day! Thy little children seem To see it when they pray. And, lo! the nations far Do point, with warning hand, To yonder stains that are Upon thy native land! The glimpses of picturesque Spain were not more lovely to the writer's young eyes than the homely beauties of New England, as the following lines from ‘The Road Over the Hills’ will show:— The squirrel quick hath run Across the track unto the old gray wall, Wreathed o'er with thorny vines, while brambles tall Beset it 'round; and 'neath the summer sun Floats the bronzed butterfly until—behold!— H
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, The Prospect Hill Park Celebration. (search)
flag with its ‘Qui Transtulit Sustinet’ and the motto of all the revolutionists, ‘An Appeal to Heaven.’ Nor were all the troops that gathered here even from New England. Riflemen of Virginia and Pennsylvania and Maryland camped upon these slopes, and in this first serious contest of our country against a foreign enemy, as in thf the city government, consider its claim for recognition? The Blessing of the Bay was the forerunner of that great shipbuilding interest that made Medford and New England famous—the forerunner, also, of the American navy, for it became the first armed cruiser of America, and although of tiny proportions—only twenty-one tons—it did good service along the shores of New England in protecting the interests of the settlers—the traders and the fishermen—from the attacks of Indians and others on the high seas. Mr. Mayor, when the history of Somerville shall appear, one of the most interesting chapters, I fancy, will refer to ‘Somerville During the
rench and Indian wars had given him great renown as a brave, energetic, and resolute soldier, full of resources and love of country. He had already shown that he was an ardent and active friend of the cause of the colonies, and his rank was now that of lieutenant-colonel. His coming was hailed by all with greatest enthusiasm, and was worth, says Colonel Drake, the historian, an accession of ten thousand men to the movement on foot at that critical juncture. It was decided that a large New England or American army should be raised, and a stirring appeal was speedily sent broadcast to this end; and as the quota from Connecticut would be about six thousand men, Putnam hurried back to that state to put matters in train for their swift recruitment, organization, and march. As soon as he had done this, he hastened his return to Cambridge before them with a company of his own, and with a drove of sheep for the suffering patriots of Boston. He was stationed by General Ward, the commande
a River50 Nashua Village50, 51 Nathan Tufts Park66 Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.23 Navigation on the Merrimac49 Necrology Committee, Report of22 Neighborhood Sketch, No. 642 Newbury, Mass.40 Newell, John36 New England Bank, Boston43 ‘New England,’ Neal42 ‘New England's Crisis,’ Thompson34 New Haven, Conn.20 New Rochelle, N. Y.12, 13 Nixon, Col.94 Normandy, France10, 12 North, Charles H.45 North Church, Boston38 North Chelmsford, Mass.55 North End School, Boston62 North WeymoNew England's Crisis,’ Thompson34 New Haven, Conn.20 New Rochelle, N. Y.12, 13 Nixon, Col.94 Normandy, France10, 12 North, Charles H.45 North Church, Boston38 North Chelmsford, Mass.55 North End School, Boston62 North Weymouth, Mass.4 Norton, John34 Nowell, Alexander60 Nowell, Samuel60 New York City7 New York Independent, The6 Officers Somerville Historical Society24, 48, 72 ‘Old Landmarks of Middlesex’87 Old Middlesex Canal, Historical Sketch of49 Old Mill, The13, 66, 81 Old Pound, The26 Oliver Street, Somerville44 ‘Only A Keepsake’9 Otis Street, Somerville44 Oxford, Mass.12 Paine, William64 Parker, Ebenezer, Schoolmaster, 172565 Parks, Thomas38 Payson, Prudence33 Pearl Street, Some