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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16.. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
of interest. With the immigration of the sturdy and worthy Scotch-Irish to New England, several families came to Medford. William McClintock, when others of his cc life. His third wife was the mother of Samuel, coming with her husband to New England. The boy's education began in our grammar school and was continued under Mal. Samuel McClintock was considered one of the best classical scholars in New England, received degrees from his own college, Harvard and Yale. His printed sermono one can escape death and taxes, and the tax lists and assessors' books of New England towns are a great help in proving residence. Mr. and Mrs. Bannister becam. At that time Mr. Brooks had the reputation of being the wealthiest man in New England. A letter written by Edward Everett while here is in possession of our Pu Prince of Wales purchased during his visit to this country Brown's Crown of New England? Rev. John Pierpont, who had been minister to the First Parish, died in 1
th the faces lettered Boston 5 miles. Lowell 20 miles. When Lowell was started, a great many tip-carts and truck of all sorts passed through the square. Because the natives were so often asked the way to Lole by emigrants on foot, John Howe, a selectman whose business was near by, insisted on lettering this post thus for their information. As very few of them could read, the guide-post was called Howe's Folly. The first mill employees at Lowell were from the country towns of New England; but later came the deluge. James Ewell, who was employed on the highways many years, said that after its removal the stone post was built into a bridge over Gravelly brook, and that the heavy cap-stone lay for a time in the department yard on Swan street. We well remember the old way-mark at the street corner, a portion painted white to receive the black letters. As we recall it, there was a lantern projected cornerwise from it over the sidewalk and lighted with gas. Mr. Wait'
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Medford parsonage and later occupants. (search)
e eighteenth century-and now again largely used. One of its early examples in Medford was the Turell-Porter house, (See Vol. V. No. 1 Register for view). Built not long after Parson Turell's settlement, (1725) it was duplicated by the Watson house (1738-1912) in its original construction. It occupied a conspicuous position at the turn of highway ere descending the hill to cross Meeting-house brook. There it faced both the road, and the sun at noon, and before it were planted the usual New England elms. It differed from the Watson house, in that there were three dormer windows in its steep roof, which also projected more over the front wall. It had the same elaborate finish around the entrance door, and substantial window frames with heavy blinds on all. One great chimney with cavernous fireplaces was in the middle of the house, which sat low on the ground and was doubtless in early times banked in winter for warmth of cellar. Like the Watson house, it was enlarged rearward
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., South Medford one hundred and fifty years ago. (search)
ase, may have it on reasonable Terms for a Number of Years. For further Particulars enquire of Isaac Royall, Esq'r at Medford There has been no more than Two Tenants on the above Farm for 35 Years last past. From Boston News Letter and New England Chronicle, Thursday, March 17, 1763. The farm referred to in the above advertisement is the easterly portion of the Royall estate, the westerly boundary being at or near the line of Two-Penny Brook, the northerly boundary is the Mystic Rive railway. The Mystic Trotting Park with its mile-track was located between the Mystic House (built in '46) and the turnpike. Its location was then known as the Adams farm, and early in war time a military camp was there. Several times the New England Fair or cattle-show was held there; and for years the numerous horse races drew vast crowds of the sporting fraternity. In more recent years its neighbor, Combination Park, with more pretentious structures, flourished for a time; its grand s