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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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the vital interests of the Northwest which concentrate upon the Mississippi river. This proposition may be assumed as true for the rest of the struggle; that the Northwest are hereafter to provide the great body of troops for the Northern armies, and that the Middle and Eastern States will be expected to contribute, as their quota of aid, the arms, munitions, clothing, and supplies of all kinds required for the war. As a general rule, good artisans are great cowards, as the regiments of New England and New York have abundantly demonstrated in the field. It is the rural districts only that furnish brave volunteers; and it is only in the granary of the great West that the North can recruit any troops worth bringing into the field. It is a mistake to suppose that the Northwest are disaffected to this Lincoln war. They are even more fierce and determined than the Yankees of the East, whose zeal in every. thing is measured by the rule, what does it pay? Lincoln himself is a true i