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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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ible threats against the safety and even purity of your dwelling, it is a most flagrant piece of barbarity to make him a prisoner, and put him in jail, instead of offering him the honors of your mansion, giving him the best room, making haste to furnish him with spiritual consolation, and not forgetting those spirituous appliances which gentlemen of his profession never fail to appreciate. In like manner, those heroes of the handcuff and halter, who came all the way from New York and New England with the avowed purpose of destroying our lives, robbing us of our property, and perpetrating crimes worse than death upon helpless women, ought to be lodged at the Spotswood House, or Exchange, instead of tobacco factories, be fed upon venison and oysters and champagne, visited by the ladies, have the benefit of clergy, and be caressed, petted, soothed, and solaced in every conceivable manner for the melancholy disappointment on the 21st of July, and various other occasions, of their ch
The Confederate Generals — a Correction. In the list of Confederate Generals recently published in this paper and copied from the Charleston Courier, there were some errors, two of which have been brought to our notice. Brigadier General Wm. H. C. Whiting is reported in the list to be a native of Massachusetts. Gen. Whiting was born in Mississippi at the opposite extreme of the old Union from puritanical Massachusetts While good men have been, beyond question, born in that leading New England State, we cannot find fault with Gen. W. for not coveting that honor for himself! By some strange oversight of the compiler of the list, Gen. Beauregard is left out of the list of West Point graduates. This noble officer, who enjoys so much of the confidence of the South, graduated in that institution with honor and entered the army as Lieutenant of Engineers in 1838.