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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 4, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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her object was, not to abolish slavery — for her commerce and manufactures were dependent upon its products — but to divide the United States, on which she was dependent for products essential to her welfare. Slavery in Brazil, in Cuba, in other countries, received no attention from English philanthropists; it was only slavery in America that excited their horror and aroused their energies. It was to America that they sent emissaries, stirring up the smouldering embers of fanaticism in New England, and urging on that war of aggression upon Southern Rights which has culminated in the present bloody struggle. It was abolition authors like Mrs. Stowe, and fugitive negroes from the Southern States, who were made the companions and pets of the British nobility. All the moral aid and comfort that any nation could give to say cause on the face of the earth was given by Great Britain to the abolition cause in America, and never, till the Union was dissolved, did England ever discover tha