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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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et patriots and practical men take their places. Yankee accounts from Fredericksburg. A correspondent of the New York Herald, writing on the 12th inst. from Fredericksburg, notices that trade is increasing there. The brute says that "New England calicoes vie successfully with the sombre crape of mourners for rebel fathers, husbands, and sons." The cotton factory is again at work: Though seventy miles from Washington, and at almost an equal distance from Richmond, the heavy boom otion with the South for the sake of a free Southern commerce. I somewhat fear this result, since an Eastern and Western collision seems to have shown itself in our Congress. There is, probably, less sympathy for the slave at the West than in New England, from the fact that the capabilities of black men, in a state of abject servitude, are better known there than among us, and that the Western people know less, and think less, of the elevating power of freedom and of education, in the negro ra