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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1,936 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 142 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 22 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Atlantic Ocean or search for Atlantic Ocean in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 9: operations of Admiral Dupont's squadron in the sounds of South Carolina. (search)
o communicate with the Confederacy in that direction. As a rule they had abandoned their beats, and either kept to running into Charleston or Wilmington, or went to the coasts of Alabama and Texas, where their chances were better than in the South Atlantic. The South Atlantic coast was throughout the war the favorite ground for blockade runners, and the hardest blockading duty was performed in that quarter. Rich prizes were sometimes taken, and watchful commanders often reaped uncommon rewantic. The South Atlantic coast was throughout the war the favorite ground for blockade runners, and the hardest blockading duty was performed in that quarter. Rich prizes were sometimes taken, and watchful commanders often reaped uncommon rewards; but with it all there was a monotonous watchfulness that wore men out, and many officers after the war fell into bad health, if they did not altogether succumb to the influence of a climate which in winter or summer was not conducive to longevity.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
oor people before their eyes. If he had been a man of any generosity, he would have said to the captain of the Tonawanda, Go in peace; we are not warring against women and children, and these helpless ones shall not be molested. But not he: lie had no sentiment about him, and, although lie knew the agony felt by these people, lie kept them sailing in his wake until another victim should heave in sight. But it seems that the Alabama still h]ad to play out her role before she left the North Atlantic. The good intentions that were entertained towards the passengers of the Tonawanda--to put them on board a neutral vessel — were frustrated by the arrival of another heavy ship of the junk fleet (as the grain ships were called by Semmes' men). This vessel approached the Alabama unsuspectingly until the boom of a gun and the Confederate flag at the stranger's peak showed the merchant captain that his fate was sealed, and he immediately surrendered. The Alabama had by this time become
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
e following morning, a heavy gale came on from the southeast with a tremendous swell setting towards the beach, so that it was thought at one time all the vessels would have to leave the coast to avoid being driven on shore. General Butler and his transports had disappeared and sought refuge in the harbor of Beaufort. No occurrence during the war reflects more credit on the Navy than the way in which that large fleet rode out the gale, anchored in twenty fathoms water, with the whole Atlantic Ocean rolling in upon them. As far as the eye could reach, the line of vessels extended, each with two anchors ahead and one hundred and twenty fathoms of chain on each. The wind blew directly on shore, the sea breaking heavily, and appearing as if it would sweep everything before it, yet only one vessel in all the line left her anchorage and stood out to sea as a place of safety. It was, indeed, a grand sight to see these ships riding out such a gale on such a coast in midwinter. The most
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 58: conclusion. (search)
orces during the war of the rebellion; they started with the greatest armada the world ever saw--sixty or seventy ships of the line, and numerous other vessels-of-war, transports (filled with troops), that almost covered the sea; and still they were months making any impression upon the Russian stronghold, which did not in any way compare with Vicksburg. The Federal Government commenced with four small vessels (carrying in all twenty-five guns), the duty of capturing or blockading the South Atlantic coast. In the Gulf of Mexico were eight more ships; in the Mediterranean, three more; seven were on the coast of Africa; two on that of Brazil; three were in the East Indies, and eight in the Pacific-scattered, in fact, all over the world; and these had to be collected to satisfy England and France that a perfect blockade could be established. They naturally ridiculed the attempt, yet in less than a year the blockade was accomplished, so that the most hypercritical sovereign could not