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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 426 414 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 135 135 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 34 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) or search for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 1.-occupation of New-Orleans, La. General Butler's proclamation. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 1, 1862. the city of New-OrNew-Orleans, May 1, 1862. the city of New-Orleans and its environs, with all its interior and exterior defences, having surrendered to the combined land and naval forces of the United States, and being now in New-Orleans and its environs, with all its interior and exterior defences, having surrendered to the combined land and naval forces of the United States, and being now in the occupation of the forces of the United States, who have come to restore order, maintain public tranquillity, enforce peace and quiet under the laws and Constitutims the object and purpose of the United States in thus taking possession of New-Orleans and the State of Louisiana, and the rules and regulations by which the laws been in rebellion against their authority. Thrice before has the city of New-Orleans been rescued from the hands of a foreign government and still more calamitouand are forbidden. The various companies composing the fire department of New-Orleans will be permitted to return to their organizations, and are to report to the
Doc. 2.-fight on the Mississippi River. Report of Lieut. R. B. Lowry. United States steam sloop Brooklyn, off New-Orleans, April 25, 1862. sir: I have to report, that in the action of the morning of the twenty-fourth instant, from four A. M. to half-past 5 A. M., against the rebel forts Jackson and St. Philip, masked and water-batteries, and some sixteen rebel gunboats, this ship engaged the enemy, at fifty minutes past three A. M., with shell, grape, and canister, of which one hu over eight hours. note.--The engine, berth-deck, and powder-divisions were well served by their respective officers and men stationed there, and everything connected with them was kept in perfect order. Third Assistant-Engineer Morgan stood at the bell, and executed your orders promptly and efficiently. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. B. Lowry, Lieut. United States Navy. To Captain Thomas T. Craven, Commanding United States Steamship Brooklyn, Off New-Orleans, La.
ere, too, our prisoners, some score or more, were detained, and a bevy of contrabands of all shades, who had come to our lines during the day, with their effects upon their backs, were halted for the night. While the surgeons were busy in the church, the venerable walls of which were soon crimsoned with blood, the prisoners and contrabands were quartered around blazing fires. The former were several of them officers of intelligence--one a graduate of Yale College, another a well-known New-Orleans merchant. They bore their capture with considerable equanimity, while the contrabands were as merry and loquacious as though they had reached the goal of their highest ambition. During the night Hooker's and Smith's divisions pressed forward to their respective destinations on the left and right, in front of the enemy's works at Williamsburgh. Slowly but steadily they marched by the old church, with its surrounding fires. At midnight it began to rain, and the darkness, before oppres
n States, including those of Beaufort, in the State of North-Carolina, Port Royal, in the State of South-Carolina, and New-Orleans, in the State of Louisiana, were, for reasons therein set forth, intended to be placed under blockade; and whereas the said ports of Beaufort, Port Royal, and New-Orleans have since been blockaded; but as the blockade of the same ports may now be safely relaxed with advantage to the interests of commerce, Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, Preson imports, and for other purposes, do hereby declare that the blockade of the said ports of Beaufort, Port Royal, and New-Orleans shall so far cease and determine, from and after the first day of June next, that commercial intercourse with those podent of the United States of this date, namely: Beaufort, in North-Carolina, Port Royal, in South-Carolina, and New-Orleans, in Louisiana. Licenses will be granted by consuls of the United States upon satisfactory evidence that the vessels so licen
t appeared it was discovered that the confederate gunboats Pamlico, Oregon and Carondelet were hotly engaged with four of the Federal fleet, and were slowly retiring towards the Pass, under a heavy fire of the enemy. On the arrival here of our gallant little fleet it was ascertained that the Oregon had been struck by a shell in the pilot-house, and that the Carondelet had been hit in the wheelhouse. Neither boat, however, being seriously damaged, they proceeded at once on their way to New-Orleans, the enemy at the same time advancing slowly with the iron gunboats New-London, Jackson and Hatteras, and the steamer Lewis, the latter having on board large numbers of Lincolnite troops. When within a short distance of the wharf the boats took their positions, the Lewis in front, followed by the Hatteras, Jackson and New-London, all being within a short distance of each other, and directly opposite the town. The Jackson opened fire in the direction of the wharf, at which time a conside
Doc. 29.-the destitution of New-Orleans. General Butler's proclamation. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 25. The deplorable state of destitution and hunger of the mechanics and workNew-Orleans, May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 25. The deplorable state of destitution and hunger of the mechanics and working classes in this city has been brought to the knowledge of the Commanding General. He has yielded to every suggestion made by the city government, and ordered every method of furnishing food to the people of New-Orleans that that government deNew-Orleans that that government desired. No relief by those officials has yet been afforded. This hunger does not pinch the wealthy and influential, the leaders of the rebellion, who have gotten up this war, and are now endeavoring to prosecute it, without regard to the starving pey eloped with the specie, as well that stolen from the United States as the banks, the property of the good people of New-Orleans, thus leaving them to ruin and starvation. Fugitives from justice many of them, and others, their associates, stayi
Doc. 33.-seizure of specie at New-Orleans. On the tenth of May, 1862, M. Conturie, Consul of the Netherlands at New-Orleans, laid before General Butler a stateNew-Orleans, laid before General Butler a statement of facts concerning the seizure of eight hundred thousand dollars in specie at the office of the Hope Insurance Company in that city. General Butler having lea the foreign consuls sent to Gen. Butler the following formal protest: New-Orleans, May 12, 1862. Major-Gen. B. F. Butler, United States Army, Commanding Depare following reply to the protest: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 12, 1862. Messrs.: I have the protest which you have thought it propanding. On the thirteenth of May, a committee of the Associated Banks of New-Orleans requested per-mission to restore their specie to their vaults. The General's reply was as follows: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 14, 1862. Messieurs: I have given very careful consideration to the matter of
Doc. 38.-General Butler's order no. 28. headquarters, Department of Gulf New-Orleans, May 15. As officers and soldiers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from women calling themselves ladies, of New-Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is orderedNew-Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered hereafter, when any female shall by mere gesture or movement insult, or show contempt for any officers or soldiers of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman about town plying her avocation. By command of Major-Gen. Butler. Geo. C. Strong, A. A.G. This order fell into the hands ofBeauregard, who issued the following: For the information of the army, general order No. Twenty-eight of the Federal officer, Major-Gen. Butler commanding at New-Orleans, will be read on dress-parade. Men of the South, shall our mothers, wives, daughters and sisters be thus outraged by the ruffianly soldiers of the North, to
Doc. 65.-execution of W. B. Mumford. New-Orleans, June 7, 1862. Early yesterday morning it was announced that William B. Mumford, a man sentenced to death for tearing down the United Statest-Marshal French. The document reads as follows: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, June 5. special order no 70. William B. Mumford, a citizen of New-Orleans, having beenNew-Orleans, having been convicted before the military commission of treason and an overt act thereof in tearing down the United States flag from a public building of the United States, for the purpose of inciting other evis of eight A. M. and twelve M., under the direction of the Provost-Marshal of the district of New-Orleans; and for so doing this shall be his sufficient warrant. By command of Major-General Butler, Growd, stated, in substance, that he was a native of North-Carolina, but had been a citizen of New-Orleans for many years. That the offence for which he was condemned to die was committed under excit
Doc. 68.-foreigners at New-Orleans. The following correspondence passed between the foreign consuls at New-Orleans and New-Orleans and General Butler: New-Orleans, June 11. sir: It has been represented to the undersigned by Mr. Covas, of the commerciaNew-Orleans, June 11. sir: It has been represented to the undersigned by Mr. Covas, of the commercial firm of Covas & Negroponte, carrying on business in this city, that certain sugars bought by that firm, conjointly with Mes. Benj. F. Butler, Commanding Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, La. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, JuNew-Orleans, June 12, 1862. gentlemen: In the matter of the sugars in possession of Mr. Covas, who is the only party known to the United ment of the United States had said that with the port of New-Orleans there should be no strictly mercantile transactions. W. Benachi, Greek Consul. General orders no. 41. New Orleans, June--, 1862. To Major-General B. F. Butler, Commanding, Swiss Consul. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, La., June 16, 1862. gentlemen: Your protest against Ge
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