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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 426 414 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 135 135 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 34 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) or search for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
al report of Joseph Jones, M. D., L. L. D., of New Orleans, La., Surgeon-General of the United Confederate Vet and 20th, 1893. 156 Washington avenue, New Orleans, La., July, 1893. Honorable John B. Gordon, Generalof the United Confederate Veterans was held in New Orleans, La., April 8th and 9th, 1892, and my labors up to ef of Staff. At the third annual reunion in New Orleans, La., 189 organized camps of United Confederate VetWashington Avenue, New Orleans, La. Camp 1. New Orleans, La.; W. R. Lyman, com'der; med. offi., F. Tormentoths, 24; State Camp Home, Nicholls. Camp 2. New Orleans, La.; J. B. Vincent, com.; Y. R. LeMonnier, surg.; o, Ill.; Capt. Jno. W. White, corn. Camp 9. New Orleans, La.; Wm. Laughlin, com.; med. offi., Joseph Jones,a, La.; Capt. D. L. Prescott, com. Camp 15. New Orleans, La.; Col. B. F. Eshleman, com.; med. Offi., Dr. W.rs, 3; deaths, 6; State Camp Home. Camp 16. New Orleans, La.; Gen. Jos. Demourelle, com. Camp 17. Baton
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Frazier's Farm, [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, February 19, 1893.] (search)
The battle of Frazier's Farm, [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, February 19, 1893.] June 29th, 1892. the part taken Therein by Louisiana troops. A paper read before the Louisiana Association of the army of Northern Virginia, February 18, 1893, by Captain John W. T. Leech, Company C, Fourteenth regiment, Louisiana infantry, Confederate States army. Comrades of the Army of Northern Virginia. In writing of the thrilling events which took place around the city of Richmond in 1862, you will bear in mind that thirty-one years have rolled by and that a man's memory, however good, must necessarily have forgotten many things which would prove very interesting if they could be recalled. But the truth of the matter is, I am growing old, and those scenes are rapidly fading away. I wore the gray then, and as the battle of life progresses I am wearing more gray, and this will continue on until that arch enemy of mankind will flank me out of every position and compel a f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
Battle echoes from Shiloh. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, October 1, 1893.] Misty traditions that Fade before the lights of history. Veterans who fight their battles over again at Jpurpose of stopping boats on the river that they might be searched for contraband goods. The New Orleans battery took exception at this and forwarded the challenge, which was promptly accepted by thwo batteries met. The Chicago battery was on the edge of a field behind a rail fence when the New Orleans battery galloped onto the field. The Chicago boys thought that was as good a time for the duel as any, so they promptly opened fire and drove the New Orleans battery out of the field. That was only the beginning of the duel, however. The two batteries were pitted against each other at seittsburg Landing, and was in the thick of the fight at Shiloh. Here it had its duel with the New Orleans battery, and suffered its first losses. Before it was really in the fight it had lost one ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
The officer who rode the gray horse. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, November 5, 1893.] A stirring episode in the story of Confederate valor. How Major C. L. Jackson won the praise of his gallant foe by his bravery in battle. Out of the musty records of the past, from time to time, there springs to light some hidden treasure or letter, that brings back in all its olden glory the chivalry and daring of the brave heroes of the Confederacy. The number of these precious, yet personal souvenirs, that are hidden away in the hearts and homes of the Southland, will never, perhaps, be known, as they have a personal and sacred value that seems too holy for the possessors to wish to parade them before the public, however important a bearing they may have upon the history of that memorable epoch. In an old scrap-book in New Orleans, the property of Mrs. Fred N. Ogden, the widow of the late lamented General Fred N. Ogden, the writer recently came across an interesting serie