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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 426 414 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 135 135 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 34 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) or search for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
The ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Pres. Jefferson Davis. Celebrated by various organizations of Southern women at New Orleans, La., June 3, 1901, with the eloquent oration of Hon. Charles E. Fenner. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterdNew Orleans, La., Picayune, June 4, 1901.] The ninety-third anniversary of the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the great leader of the Confederacy, whose memory is enshrined in thousands of hearts throughout the South, was celebrated in a fitting manner in New Orleans yesterday. Some weeks ago the loyal daughters of Louisiana undertook to make the day the occasion of a demonstration of love and devotion to the memory of Jefferson Davis, and a beautiful all-day celebration was planned, which for patriotism and loyalty has seldom been equaled in the South. The sun shone in all its brilliancy yesterday, out in the meadows the flowers were blooming, and over in Metairie cemetery, where for two years the remains of the South's great hero reposed, flowers placed by
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis Monument Association holds the First celebration of the day of memory. (search)
lled to the fact that his corn field was being frequently robbed. One morning as he entered the field he saw a black object near him in the corn, and, approaching nearer he saw it was a grizzly bear, which sprang upon him and planted his fangs in his left hand. With his right hand he hastily drew his bowie knife from its scabbard and stabbed the bear to death. This shows the presence of mind of the man, and the courage he was accustomed to display on all occasions. The whole city of New Orleans bowed down in grief at the death of Mr. Davis, and followed his mortal remains to their resting place in Metairie cemetary Mr. McCaleb concluded by telling how in this city of monuments the good women now propose to erect a monument to Mr. Davis, a suitable shaft which would commemorate the virtues of this illustrious chieftian. He commended the work and said: Let the monument be erected in the busy haunts of the great metropolis, so that our children as they pass beneath its shadow m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
United States Military Academy at West Point, where he remained 'till April, 1860; subsequent to which, 'till his resignation, he was the medical purveyor at New Orleans, La. Though a great lover of his country and his State, he was not a politician, and was greatly distressed in mind as to where his duty called, at the same tishby Moore Bayne; III. Lloyd Moore Bayne. references.—The reports of the surgeon-generals of the United Confederate Veterans—viz: Joseph Jones, M. D., of New Orleans, La., and C. H. Tebault, M. D., of New Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the MediNew Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the Medical and Surgical Journal of the Con- federate States; the Rise and fall of the Confederate States Government, Vol. I, page 310; the Richmond Dispatch, June 1, 1889; the Surgeon-General's office, Washington, D. C. A memory of May 5, 1865. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, August 19, 1901.] Orders published in a paper ann
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dr. Samuel P. Moore. (search)
United States Military Academy at West Point, where he remained 'till April, 1860; subsequent to which, 'till his resignation, he was the medical purveyor at New Orleans, La. Though a great lover of his country and his State, he was not a politician, and was greatly distressed in mind as to where his duty called, at the same tishby Moore Bayne; III. Lloyd Moore Bayne. references.—The reports of the surgeon-generals of the United Confederate Veterans—viz: Joseph Jones, M. D., of New Orleans, La., and C. H. Tebault, M. D., of New Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the MediNew Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the Medical and Surgical Journal of the Con- federate States; the Rise and fall of the Confederate States Government, Vol. I, page 310; the Richmond Dispatch, June 1, 1889; the Surgeon-General's office, Washington, D
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
cept where the town is located on a ridge about three feet above low tide. The town is situated on the west or Texas side, about five miles from the gulf end of the stream. On the Texas bank the Confederates had erected a mud fort about one mile from the gulf. This fort was manned by forty-two men all told, under the command of Lieutenant Richard (commonly known as Dick) W. Dowling. He was born in Galway, Ireland, and came to America when a child with his parents, who settled in New Orleans, La. He was at the time of this battle very young, but he was a brave soldier, and fully competent to do the work which fate had destined for him. On the 7th of September, the night previous to the battle, the Federal fleet began arriving from New Orleans. When daylight came the Confederates viewed with consternation the formidable sight. They had not one charge of ammunition, nor even a hand-bar with which to throw the guns around on their travel bars, inside the fort. Captain Odlum s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
. Cold Harbor, Battle of, 230, 285, 302. Columbia, S. C., Burning of, 115. Confederate States, Association of Army and Navy Surgeons, 277; Memorial Association, New Orleans, 7; Contest of the, 18; Statesmen of, outlawed, 46; flag, 208; Ordinance Department, 319; Dead at Mt. Jackson, Va.. 321—at Arlington, 354—at Elmira, N. Y., 193; State Department, 319; Sufferings of Soldiers in Prison, 126. Constitution of the United States, 19. Davis, Jefferson, Celebration of birth of, in New Orleans, La., 1; Monument Association, 3; Trials and Trial of, 45; Capture of, 46; Harsh treatment of. 50; Counsel of, 72; Sureties of, 74; Indictment of 75; Instructions of, for peace 192; Joseph E., 11; Joseph R., 8; Robert W., killed, 258. Derry. Joseph T., 360. Deserters in 1865, 290. Dixie. Land of, 36. Dowling, Lieutenant Dick 817. Drewry's Bluff, Fight of, 284. Elmira Prison, N. Y., Confederate States dead at, 193. Fenner Hon. C E.. Oration of, 7. Flag, Confederate Sta