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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 426 414 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 135 135 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 34 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) or search for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.41 (search)
Reminiscences of the Confederacy. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, October 27, 1907. J. U. Payne, of New Orleans, La.—His devotion to, and sacrifices for, the Cause. By C. H. Coffin. In the year 1892 I bought from Mr. J. U. Payne, of New Orleans, his summer home, Rosehart, Pass Christian, Miss. It had been closed for some years. The grounds were grown up with cane and weeds to a colossal height and were impenetrable. The place fronts 250 feet on the Shell Beach Boulevard, from which a beach lot sloped down to the Gulf of Mexico. From this lot a pier 1,080 feet long extended to the channels in the gulf. At the end of it was an octagon house containing eight rooms, for tearooms and bathrooms, surrounded by a gallery. About fifty yards beyond the bath-house was a dance platform in the lake. In the olden times a negro band played on the platform. In the evening the boats rowed up to the pier, which was lighted, and guests were received and entertained there. During
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
How Mosquitoes prevented capture of Farragut. From the Times-dispatch, December 23, 1907. New Orleans, La.,. December 22, 1907. That a mosquito bite once stood between Admiral Farragut and death, and that ninety bodies now moulder in the old monitor Tescumseh, lying in the gulf off Fort Morgan, Ala., are facts discovered by Rear-Admiral E. E. Roberts, U. S. N. (retired), who is here for the first time since 1862, when, as a lieutenant of engineers, attached to Admiral Farragut's Squadron, he was in all the notable naval operations along the Southern coast and came up the Mississippi River and captured New Orleans. Admiral Roberts was with Admiral Farragut in the battle of Mobile Bay. He was at the capture of Fort Fisher, at the mouth of Cape Fear River, and at that time was a messmate of Admiral Dewey, who was then a lieutenant-commander. Admiral Roberts recently visited the old forts near Mobile, Ala. I have learned, said Admiral Roberts, that in the summer o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
The battle of Shiloh. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, Aug. 31, Sept. 7, 1902. The first great battle of the Civil War—Undisciplined Confederate levies rout twice their Numbers— the opening day of an historic combat. By General Thomas Jordan, C. S. A. Despite the minute precautions urged in the order for the day against all courses calculated to divulge to the enemy the approaching danger, there had immediately prior to the battle of Shiloh really been little circumspection on the part of the Confederate soldiery, one-third of whom were fresh levies, wholly raw and undisciplined. Fires had been kindled, drums, too, were lustily beaten in a number of regiments, and scattering discharges of small arms had been kept up all night in most of the brigades, the men being apprehensive that otherwise the charges of their guns, possibly wet, would fail them when needed. These, with other noises, ought to have betrayed to the Federal generals on the first line the presence in th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
elite and Reliance, Wilmington Station; Charleston Station, and Semmes Naval Brigade. Francis O. S. Curtis, Dillon, S. C.—Surgeon's steward cruiser Pee Dee; Tucker's Naval Regiment; captured at evacuation of Richmond. Peter P. Carthy, New Orleans, La.—Engineer C. S. N.; served on Charleston Station; flagship Charleston. G. W. Fisher, Louisville, Ky.—First assistant engineer C. S. N.; was assigned to duty in naval works. B. F. D. Fitch, Louisville, Ky.—Enrolled at Louisville, reunionsiana Battery, light artillery; steamer Gaines, Battery Buchanan. N. C. Whittle, Norfolk, Va.—Lieutenant C. S. N.; served on steamer Nashville, steamer Louisiana; prisoner, steamer Chattahoochie and cruiser Shenandoah. Edwin P. Weaver, New Orleans, La.—Engineer C. S. N.; served on steamer Gains and Mobile Station. John T. Walker, New York City-Midshipman U. S. N., lieutenant C. S. N.; served on steamer Ellis, steamer Patrick Henry, battle of Hampton Roads, at naval battle of Drewry
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. (search)
Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. General Smith's Ferocious policy in the Philippines anticipated by Sherman in Tennessee and Mississippi— Cold—Blooded Murder near Memphis in 1862—Other Typical incidents. By Hon. J. P. Young, Judge of the Circuit Court, Memphis, Tenn. Judge Young served as a private soldier in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry, and shared the memorable campaigns of the great Forrest, although he was only nineteen years of age when the war closed.—Ed. Mr. Sibley, of Pennsylvania, in criticising General Jacob H. Smith, of the American Army in the Philippines, during a recent debate in Congress for cruelty to noncombatants, said: When I have read, as I have within the past forty-eight hours, that a general wearing the uniform of the United States Army, one who stands under the shadow of our flag, issues orders not to conciliate a province, but to leave it a howling wilderness, and to kill all above ten years