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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 104 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 64 34 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Milford (New Jersey, United States) or search for Milford (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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Ten thousand people out of employment. In Newark, New Jersey, that hot-bed of Abolitionism which makeshifts living by manufacturing clothes, carriages, and, probably, emissaries of Republicanism, for the Southern States, ten thousand people, says the New York Express, are out of employment. Many of them, says the Express, have been living, in good part, upon charity all winter, but still living on in hopes that when the 4th of March came, the Administration would discover "a policy" which would restores confidence and credit, thaw out the frozen channels of business, and enable them once more to earn bread for themselves and families. Hope deferred, however, is making the heart sick. The expectations of relief from the Lincoln Administration have not been realized. The prospects of the great manufacturing interest with which they are connected, are more unpromising than ever. Hence they are now beginning to inquire, how long is this state of things to last? and to manifest