Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Norfolk (Virginia, United States) or search for Norfolk (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
. M. Ross. Patterson's Battery, Captain G. M. Patterson. Irwin Artillery, Captain J. T. Wingfield. McIntosh's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel D. G. McIntosh. Johnson's Battery, Captain [V. J. Clutter.] Hardaway Artillery, Captain W. B. Hurt. Danville Artillery, Captain R. S. Rice. Second Rockbridge Artillery, Captain L. Donald. Richardson's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel C. Richardson. Lewis Artillery, Captain N. Penick. Donaldsonville Artillery, Captain V. Maurin. Norfolk Light Artillery, Captain C. R. Grandy. Huger Artillery, Captain J. D. Moore. Pegram's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Pegram. Pee Dee Artillery, [Captain E. B. Brunson]. Fredericksburg Artillery, Captain E. A. Marye. Letcher Artillery, Captain T. A. Brander. Purcell Battery, [Captain Geo. M. Cayce]. Crenshaw's Battery, Captain T. Ellett. Poague's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel W. T. Poague. Madison Artillery, [Captain T. J. Richards]. Albemarle Artillery, Captain J.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
he Mexican war, stored principally at Baton Rouge and Mount Vernon arsenals. I doubt whether there were a million rounds of small-arm cartridges in the Confederacy. Lead there was none in store. Of powder the chief supply was that captured at Norfolk, though there was a small quantity at each of the Southern arsenals, say 60,000 pounds in all, chiefly old cannon powder. The stock of percussion caps could not have exceeded one-quarter of a million. Artillery. There were no batteries ofstematize the operations of two small private mills, which were then at work for the State of Tennessee. Thus, in respect to powder and our means of making it, we had, perhaps, at this time (June 1st, 1861,) 250,000 pounds, chiefly cannon, at Norfolk and in Georgia, and as much more nitre (mainly imported by the State of Georgia). We had no powder-mills, except the two rude ones just referred to, and no experience in making powder or in getting nitre. All had to be learned. As to a furth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ammunition, powder and lead. (search)
Ammunition, powder and lead. There was little ammunition of any kind, or powder, at the arsenals in the South, and that little relics of the Mexican war, stored principally at Baton Rouge and Mount Vernon arsenals. I doubt whether there were a million rounds of small-arm cartridges in the Confederacy. Lead there was none in store. Of powder the chief supply was that captured at Norfolk, though there was a small quantity at each of the Southern arsenals, say 60,000 pounds in all, chiefly old cannon powder. The stock of percussion caps could not have exceeded one-quarter of a million.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
West Point, in every way qualified for this service, arrived in Richmond, through the blockade, and at once set out under written instructions from me to carry out the President's wishes. He, however, went first to East Tennessee to supervise and systematize the operations of two small private mills, which were then at work for the State of Tennessee. Thus, in respect to powder and our means of making it, we had, perhaps, at this time (June 1st, 1861,) 250,000 pounds, chiefly cannon, at Norfolk and in Georgia, and as much more nitre (mainly imported by the State of Georgia). We had no powder-mills, except the two rude ones just referred to, and no experience in making powder or in getting nitre. All had to be learned. As to a further supply of arms, steps had been taken by the President to import these and other ordnance stores from Europe; and Major Caleb Huse, a graduate of West Point, and at that moment professor in the University of Alabama, was selected to go abroad and s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
he Confederate flag, before the blockaders returned to port. After this she made several successful trips through the blockade and later was transferred to other parties, and subsequently she was attacked by the enemy and destroyed at the mouth of the Ogechee river. I am persuaded that the Federals did not know that the Nashville went into Georgetown until it was revealed to them by my capture below New Orleans in April, 1862. I had then among my private papers the rough draft of my report to Secretary Mallory, in which I had announced to him the escape of the vessel from Morehead City and her entrance into Georgetown. The Federal officer who read this rough report seemed to have the impression that the Nashville had sailed direct to Nassau, and so expressed himself to me. On my telling him that I had taken her into Georgetown he was greatly surprised, and the circumstances of her escape were thus for the first time communicated to the Federal Government. Norfolk, Va., 1882.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our heroic dead. (search)
Our heroic dead. A Poem by Captain James Barron hope. Read on Memorial Day at Norfolk, June 18th, 1884. A King once said of a Prince struck down, ‘Taller he seems in death.’ And this speech holds truth, for now as then 'Tis after death that we measure men. And as mists of the past are rolled away Our heroes, who died in their tattered gray, Grow ‘taller’ and greater in all their parts Till they fill our minds as they fill our hearts. And for those who lament them there's this relief— Th hither brought From the gallant men who against us fought; York and Lancaster!—Gray and Blue! Each to itself and the other true!— And so I say Our Men in Gray Have left to the South and North a tale Which none of the glories of Earth can pale. Norfolk has names in the sleeping host Which fill us with mournful pride— Taylor and Newton, we well may boast, McPhail, and Walke, and Selden, too, Brave as the bravest, as truest true! And Grandy struck down ere his May became June, A battle-
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Artillery at the Southern arsenals. (search)
senals. At the Fayetteville, N. C., arsenal, there was a fine battery of brass field pieces—four six-pounder guns, and two twelve-pounder howitzers, with forge and battery wagon complete. When the arsenal was surrendered to the State forces, this battery was turned over to the Ellis Light Artillery Company, of Raleigh, first commanded by Captain S. D. Ramseur, who, as Major-General commanding division, was killed at Cedar Creek, in the Valley, in October, 1864. The battery first saw service near Norfolk and on the Peninsula, and was subsequently known as Manly's Battery (Captain B. C. Manly), of Cabell's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. In time the company no doubt fell heir to twelve-pounder Napoleons, or to rifled pieces, but guns of that kind were not much known in the early days of 1861, and a company provided with a complete battery of guns of almost any calibre, with necessary appurtenances, was then thought to be very well equipped. Respectfully, Graham Daves
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A leaf from my log-book. (search)
brother officers who were upon blue water. If we could gain possession of the river and hold it Grant would be compelled to fall back, as City Point would no longer furnish him a base and the James river an avenue of supplies, and to effect this object, the possession of the river at City Point, it was decided to make an effort to blow up the Federal iron-clads, clear a passage for our fleet and force the abandonment of City Point, or compel Grant to fall back or bring his supplies from Norfolk. To drive him back would have necessitated an army equal in numbers to his own and a fearful cost of life. Under these conditions Lieutenant C. W. Read, of the navy, organized an expedition whose object was to carry boats, fitted with torpedoes, on wheels, and, turning Grant's left, strike boldly across the country in his rear, cross the Blackwater, and launch our boats in the James above their anchorage at Hampton Roads, capture some passing tugs, fix our torpedoes on them, ascend the