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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 23 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 30 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ched this conclusion at the close of March, 1841, and it was arranged that both names should appear in the paper, but that Mrs. Child should have immediate charge, removing to New York, while her husband remained on his beet-sugar farm near Northampton, Mass. (Ms. Mar. 30, 31, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). Rogers in July began to urge his very brother to make the Ms. July 16, 1841, Rogers to W. L. G. trip in question, then far from fashionable or well-known, or well-provided with houses of Knapp, for whom they offered to serve as a finance committee. On the same sheet containing the circular and Knapp's autographic letter of transmission, Mr. Garrison wrote thus to his brother-in-law: W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson, at Northampton, Mass. Cambridgeport, Dec. 17, 1841. Ms. You will see, by the accompanying Circular, what mischief is brewing, and what a hostile position is assumed toward me, the Liberator Committee, and the Massachusetts A. S. Society, by my old, er
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ich are near at hand, as Mr. Garrison judged. Nothing can prevent the dissolution of the American Union but the abolition of slavery. Lib. 12.31. This conviction had now complete possession of him. W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson at Northampton, Mass. Boston, March 22, 1842. Ms. If all be well (and, so mutable are all things here below, we can promise nothing as to the future without prefixing an if), I shall go to Albany about the 21st of April, in company with C. L. Remond, and folly to deny the authenticity of the Address, and, of course, a meeting called with especial reference to it will be pretty sure to be well attended, and to create a wholesome excitement. In going or returning, I shall endeavor to visit Northampton (most probably on returning), and, if practicable, make Remond accompany me. I intend, if I can, to add Wendell Phillips to our company. So, you may make your arrangements, at your leisure, for at least one incendiary meeting in your place.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
ity. As the lease would expire on July 1, it was decided to remove for the summer to the country, and no place offered such attractions as the Community at Northampton, Mass. This was the third of those original experiments by which Massachusetts, as J. H. Noyes says, appears to have anticipated the advent of Fourierism, and t ante, p. 71. are inclined to hope that Dr. Warren knows as much about the matter as any of these new lights, and that Garrison may get over it. He is now at Northampton, with Geo. Benson, his wife's brother, at a Community to which Prof. Adam belongs. He Ante, 2.353. went there for rest, and the way he rests himself is to lecture Lib. 13.111, 117, 118. every night in the neighboring towns, and on Sundays in Northampton in the open air! D. L. Child, however, who took Boston in his way to New York to take the Standard, reports that he Lib. 13.123. looks well and seems well, with the exception of his enemy in the chest. He is also engaged, or is to be
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ass and myself, and also by Dr. Delaney, who spoke on the subject of prejudice against color in a very witty and energetic manner. Douglass was well-nigh run down, and spoke with much physical debility. . . . Saturday forenoon, Milo [Townsend], Dr. Peck, Dr. Weaver, Aug. 14, 1847. Charles Schirras, and myself, ascended a very steep eminence across the river, three hundred feet high, where we had a beautiful prospect, reminding me somewhat of the view from the top of Mount Holyoke, at Northampton, though it was not so fine or extensive, of course. . . . On reaching Milo's house, I was thoroughly tired out, and wet through and through by the perspiration. Indeed, throughout our journey, the weather has been uniformly and exceedingly warm, and I have been wet to the skin nearly all the time. To make frequent and long harangues, under such circumstances, is quite overpowering. I have never perspired so much in my life. The quantity of water thus exuded through the pores of the s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
hers'—prescribed Lib. 18.110; Ms. May 3, 1848, W. L. G. to E. Pease. for him the water-cure. At Bensonville, near Northampton, Mass., the seat of the lately defunct Community of which George W. Benson had been a leading spirit, Ante, pp. 81, 83. aith others to defray Garrison's personal expenses and lighten his domestic burden. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Northampton, July 18, 1848. Ms. The trip in the cars to this place, yesterday, was much more pleasant than the one I took with W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Bensonville, July 26, 1848. Ms. To-day there is to be a Free Soil Convention in Northampton, and several of us will go down this afternoon to judge of its character and spirit—dispensing with our usual bath. Ter could but excite the distrust of the abolition chiefs. Mr. Garrison wrote privately in August to Mr. Quincy from Northampton: As for the Free Soil movement, I feel that great care is Lib. 18.134. demanded of us Disunionists, both in the
ved him that the platform adopted admitted slavery in the Lib. 22.137. States to be legal and tolerated by the Constitution, and he could not bring himself to vote for Hale in the Convention, though prepared to do so at the polls. Neither could he recommend disbanding the Liberty Party, though persuaded that the Free Democracy were better than their platform, and would not break up in coalitions and disgrace themselves like the Free Soil Party. On August 24, Wendell Phillips wrote from Northampton to Mrs. Garrison: Tell Garrison that it seems to me Douglass will come out for Hale. What nonsense!—hold the Constitution to be anti-slavery, justify one's self in voting on that theory, and then vote for a man who don't agree with the theory! Ms. In practice, it made no difference which way any political abolitionist voted in November, 1852. The two preponderating parties, Whig and Democratic, at their nominating conventions, competed, in the language of Charles J. Ingersoll (who