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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 28 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 5 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 16 14 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 5 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 4 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 3 1 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Oberlin (Ohio, United States) or search for Oberlin (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
counsels of the froward headlong. . . . Have you attentively read the little work I left with you, by J. H. Noyes? If you have done with the file of the Perfectionist which I left in your care, I will thank you to send it to me by a private conveyance whenever perfectly convenient. The difference between Noyes's Perfectionism and Mr. Cf. ante, 2.206. Garrison's was soon to be illustrated in a very signal manner. President Mahan and the Rev. Charles G. Ante 2.285, 286. Finney, of Oberlin, who belonged to the same school with Noyes and (nominally) the editor of the Liberator, assumed an attitude of hostility to non-resistance very afflicting to the last-named. Finney held, in a Fast Lib. 11.151, 176. sermon, that circumstances may arise, not only to render fighting in defence of liberty a Christian duty, but also to justify Christians in actively supporting despotism. Noyes's society at Putney, Vt., some months afterwards, Lib. 11.183. discussed the question: Is it accor
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ess of intellect. On arriving at Munson, we saw the great Oberlin tent in a distant field; but no village was to be seen, an overnight at the house of Deacon Ellsworth, on our way to Oberlin. To-day is commencement day at O., and we shall leave h thought or said of us. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Oberlin, Aug. 28, 1847. Ms. You know that, from the commencement of the Institution in Oberlin, I took a lively interest in its welfare, particularly on account of its springing up in a w in 1840, I did what I could to facilitate their mission. Oberlin has done much for the relief of the flying fugitives from nsidered. The desire that I had long cherished to visit Oberlin was Aug. 26. gratified on Thursday last. In company withe public eye, until my return. What impression we made at Oberlin, I cannot say; but I was abundantly satisfied as to the aping to do, what I have in vain sought to do since I was at Oberlin—and that is, to finish this letter. Our meetings at Ric
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
t had better never have been born. Whigs and Democrats managed the Buffalo Lib. 18.131. Convention that resulted in placing before the country the nominations of Martin Van Buren for President, and Charles Francis Adams for Vice-President, on a platform of Free Soil, Free Speech, Free Labor, and Free Men [wherever slavery is not established already]. Lib. 18.142. The Liberty Party representatives were there to yield, not to dictate. They heard, with feeble protests, President Mahan of Oberlin claim the credit of the new movement for Ohio, and inquire whether, if they could have had the drawing up of the platform, they could have produced a better. In the conference committee over the nominations, Henry B. Stanton was authorized to say that John P. Hale would submit to the action of the Convention; and when Van Buren led largely on the first ballot, Joshua Leavitt completed the suicide of the Liberty Party by moving that Van Buren's nomination be made unanimous. The Liberty Par
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
all. He took a very subordinate part in the Ms. Sept. 5, 1853, W. L. G. to H. E. G.; Lib. 23.146. proceedings, in which the women were of right conspicuous. Few of the clergy were visible, and no dignitaries. On the next evening (Saturday), he witnessed the Sept. 3. performance of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre. On Sunday morning, he listened to a sermon delivered to a Sept. 4. great audience in Metropolitan Hall by Miss Antoinette Lib. 23.146. L. Brown. A graduate of Oberlin. She was shortly ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at South Butler, N. Y. (Lib. 23: 151). In the afternoon, he spoke in the same place Lib. 23.142, 146. before the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, and attended without addressing the evening meeting, towards the close of which, during the speeches of Lucy Stone, who never acquitted herself better, and Lucretia Mott, the rowdyism led by the redoubtable Rynders became so rampant that the session was cut short. But we are all i