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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 200 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 112 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 54 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 26 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Ohio (United States) or search for Ohio (United States) in all documents.

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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Autobiographical sketch. (search)
tive for the most of the time, until late in the spring, when, as all active hostilities had ceased, we were marched across to Tampa Bay, from whence my company, with some other troops, was shipped to New Orleans, and then sent up the Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee Rivers to Ross' Landing (now Chattanooga) to report to General Scott, who had charge of the removal of the Cherokees, with whom some difficulty was apprehended. My company was stationed near Ross' Landing, and it was soon discoveredy. After improving a little I started back to Mexico, and on my way I had the luck to meet with that fate, which is very common to Americans who travel much, that is, I was on a steamboat which was blown up, the 8th of January, 1848, on the Ohio River, a few miles below the mouth of the Kanawha. I had a very narrow escape, as half of my state-room was carried off and some pieces of the boiler protruded through the floor, cutting and burning my feet when I jumped out of the berth. The expl
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 35: battles of Cold Harbor. (search)
pecious than sound. The Mississippi River divided the Confederacy into two parts, and the immense naval power of the enemy enabled him to render communication across that river, after the loss of New Orleans and Memphis, always difficult. The Ohio River, in the West, and the Potomac, in the East, with the mountains of Western Virginia, rendered it impossible for an invading army to march into the enemy's country, except at one or two fords of the Potomac, just east of the Blue Ridge, and two or three fords above Harper's Ferry. The possession of the seas, and the blockade of our ports, as well as the possession of the Mississippi, the Ohio, and Potomac Rivers, with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the railroads through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee, enabled the enemy to transport troops, from the most remote points, with more ease and rapidity than they could be transported over the railroads under the control of the Confederate Government, all of
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 36: campaign in Maryland and Virginia. (search)
then making a circuit, empties into the North Fork of the Shenandoah, about two miles below Strasburg. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad crosses the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, and passing through Martinsburg in Berkeley County, crosses Back Creek near its mouth, runs up the Potomac, crossing the South Branch of that river near its mouth, and then the North Branch to Cumberland in Maryland. From this place it runs into Virginia again and, passing through Northwestern Virginia, strikes the Ohio River by two stems, terminating at Wheeling and Parkersburg respectively. There is a railroad from Harper's Ferry to Winchester, called Winchester & Potomac Railroad, and also one from Manassas Junction on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, through Manassas Gap in the Blue Ridge, by Front Royal and Strasburg to Mount Jackson, called The Manassas Gap Railroad, but both of these roads were torn up and rendered unserviceable in the year 1862, under the orders of General Jackson. From Staunto
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 40: in front of Washington. (search)
Grant's army, for prisoners had been captured from Rickett's division of the 6th corps at Monocacy. From Sharpsburg I had sent a message to Mosby, by one of his men, requesting him to cross the Potomac below Harper's Ferry, cut the railroad and telegraph, and endeavor to find out the condition of things in Washington, but he had not crossed the river, and I had received no information from him. A Northern paper, which was obtained, gave the information that Hunter, after moving up the Ohio River in steamboats, was passing over the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and I knew that he would be at Harper's Ferry soon, as Imboden had done very little damage to the road west of Martinsburg. After dark on the 11th I held a consultation with Major Generals Breckenridge, Rodes, Gordon and Ramseur, in which I stated to them the danger of remaining where we were, and the necessity of doing something immediately, as the probability was that the passes of the South Mountain and the fords of the up
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
241 North Anna, 359, 361, 465 North Branch, 368 North Carolina Regiments, 15, 32, 38, 47-48, 60, 62, 69, 70-71, 104, 132, 158, 185-86, 188, 193, 230, 236, 242, 244, 247, 249, 253, 274, 282, 302, 312, 341, 345, 467-68 North Fork, 335-36, 366-67-68-69, 407, 431-32, 439 North Mountain, 136, 163, 368, 383- 384, 414 North River, 331, 366, 368, 435, 462 Northern Central R. R., 255, 258 Northwestern Virginia, 191, 368 Ny River, 354, 357-58 Occoquon River, 3, 4, 5, 10, 47 Ohio River, 368, 391, 479 Old Church, 361-62-63 Old Court-House, 353 Old Stone Pike, 344, 346 Old Wilderness Tavern, 344, 346 Opequon River, 136, 162, 367-68-69, 384, 406, 408, 410, 412-14, 419- 21, 423-24, 428 Orange County, 327, 343 Orange Court-House, 56, 59, 92-93, 106, 165, 168, 285, 318, 326, 340, 344, 351 Orange & Alexandria R. R., 106, 114, 368 Orkney Springs, 333, 334 Orleans, 114 Ox Hill, 129, 131-32-33 Page County, 366, 367 Page, Lieutenant, 444, 445 Pamunke