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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 200 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 112 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 54 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 26 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ohio (United States) or search for Ohio (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
sort to every strategem to avoid battle, fearing that while fighting one enemy another might overtake and assail him. The Ohio raid. Lee was marching toward Pennsylvania and Bragg, in danger of being overwhelmed by Rosecrans, directed Morgan tothreatening Louisville. Being essential a free lance, accustomed to independent action, Morgan determined to cross the Ohio River, General Bragg's order to the contrary notwithstanding. Hitherto the career of the cavalry chieftain had been brillianin the hands of the pursuing Federal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of Jition such as the Ohio Raid the exchanging, or impressment, of horses is a military necessity. When Morgan crossed the Ohio River his men were riding fine Kentucky horses, many of them thoroughbred, peculiarly adapted to service on a long and exhaus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
distance accomplished in daily march, as well as for soldiery fortitude and endurance. Most of Chenault's Regiment were taken prisoners at Buffington's Island, Ohio, on July 17, 1863. About two hundred of this regiment made a charge under Major McCreary and escaped. at Buffington Island, but were surrounded by a large force of Federal cavalry the next day, and surrendered. A few of the men of the Eleventh were among the band of 300 troops who got safely back to Dixie by swimming the Ohio river on their horses, on the evening of July 16, under the leadership of the indomitable Adam R. Johnson; and a few more escaped capture at Buffington Island only to be made prisoners a few days later (July 26), when the intrepid Morgan made his last stand in Columbia County, Ohio, and surrendered with the remaining remnants of his gallant command. At that time Second Lieutenant Rodney Haggard, of Company A, was the ranking officer of the fragment of the 11th Kentucky Cavalry that still remain
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
Vaughn, died in Camp Douglas, November 20, 1863, of smallpox. Company F. Company F was recruited in Madison County. There are two known rolls of it in existance, covering the period from September 10, 1862, to February 28, 1863. The following roster of its officers and men is believed to be some fifteen or twenty names short: Captain—Thomas Bronston Collins, wounded at Greasy Creek, Ky., May 9, 1863, escaped with Colonel A. R. Johnson at Buffington Island, Ohio, by swimming the Ohio river, afterwards went to Canada in the secret service of the Confederacy, and was one of the twenty Confederate soldiers who made the celebrated Bank Raid at St. Albans, Vt. First Lieutenant, J. F. Oldham; second lieutenants, R. J. Parks, C. H. Covington, died of brain fever at Albany, Ky., April 1, 1863; James H. Trevis. Sergeants—Ordnance, Joseph Collins; first, James Trevis, second, James Caldwell; third, Thomas Dejarnett; fourth, W. B. Benton; fifth, J. K. Sams. Corporals—First, J<