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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Oneida (N. Y.) (New York, United States) or search for Oneida (N. Y.) (New York, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
s more brilliant feats of arms. Before the blockade was six months old, the Atlantic Squadron was divided in two. Flag-Officer Goldsborough Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee. When the war broke out, Samuel Phillips Lee, who was born in Virginia in 1811, had already seen twenty-six years of almost continuous service. During the Civil War he was frequently shifted, but everywhere set an example to the service. At the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Phillip he commanded the sloop-of-war Oneida. He fought conspicuously in the battles of the Mississippi, from New Orleans to Vicksburg. In July of 1862 he was placed in command of the North Atlantic blockading squadron, making the blockade more effective than ever. Late in the war, in the summer of 1864, he was transferred to the Mississippi squadron, keeping the Cumberland River open for the army. The sloop below, attached to the blockading squadron during the war, won quite a name for herself, although not engaged in any of the l
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
by Captain Theodorus Bailey, who had transferred his flag from the old Colorado to the little gunboat Cayuga, and was to be made up of the Pensacola, Mississippi, Oneida, Varuna, Katahdin, Kineo, and Wissahickon; Farragut led the second, or center, division, composed of the Hartford, Brooklyn, and Richmond, and Captain Bell, in thIn less than ten minutes Bailey's vessels were replying to the concentrated fire that was poured in upon them. Commander Boggs, on the Varuna, accompanied by the Oneida, had kept in close to shore, and thus escaped a great deal of the fire of the heavy guns that had been elevated and pointed to cover the midchannel. But now Bailhere she promptly sunk to her topgallant forecastle. The Confederate vessels were so pierced by the Varuna's fire that they, too, were run ashore in flames. The Oneida, which had already disabled one of the Confederate gunboats, came up and received the surrender of the Confederate Commander Kennon and the crew of the burning Go
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
age of the forts below New Orleans. There Farragut had done what was pronounced impossible, but at Mobile he had fought his way through dangers ten times more formidable. Here, with the modesty which ever characterized him, he sits within the captured Fort Gaines on Dauphin Island, discussing with General Gordon Granger plans for the combined attack by which Fort Morgan was taken on August 22, 1864. It was to Granger that Mobile finally surrendered. passed between them, and made for the Oneida, which was not under steerageway. It was at this exciting moment that the monitors drew up, and the Winnebago, forging ahead, took her position between the ram and her seemingly helpless prey. The Federal vessels had been hampered, in a measure, by being lashed side by side in couples, in the way that Farragut had run the batteries at Port Hudson, but now having passed the forts they began to cast off their lashings. Enabled, in the broader water, to maneuver and use their broadsides, t