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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 108 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) or search for Opelousas (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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, under Brigadier-General Lawler, moved from Opelousas back to New-Iberia, with a view of being whehould circumstances require it. That left at Opelousas the Third division, under General McKinnis, dge, at Barras Landing, eight miles east of Opelousas, and east of the Bayou Teche, near its junctnd Coteau, where the road from Vermillion to Opelousas crosses Muddy Bayou, about three miles from Carrion Crow Bayou, in the direction of Opelousas, and go into camp there on the north side of the , Nov. 9, 1863. I returned yesterday from Opelousas, and hasten to give you the details of a conield, or the reasons for them. We reached Opelousas after dark, on the night of the thirty-firstt Bear's Landing, eleven miles in advance of Opelousas, and came in on another road, camping at Bayou Bourbeaux, three miles nearer Opelousas than the balance of the corps. Impatient to see the boyr, and the whole fronting the north-west, or Opelousas. The prairie rose with a very gentle swell
r, and the gunboats engaged the enemy's batteries, but two.of them, the Clifton and Sachem, being disabled, were forced to surrender, the others retreated, and the whole expedition returned to Brashear City. The officers and crews of the gunboats, and about ninety sharp-shooters, who were on board, were captured, and our loss in killed and wounded was about thirty. After a long delay at Brashear City, the army moved forward by Franklin and Vermillionville, and at last accounts occupied Opelousas. Department of the Tennessee. At the date of my last annual report General Grant occupied West-Tennessee and the northern boundary of Mississippi. The object of the campaign of this army was the opening of the Mississippi River, in conjunction with the army of General Banks. General Grant was instructed to drive the enemy in the interior as far south as possible, and destroy their railroad communication; then fall back to Memphis, and embark his available forces on transports, an
th,) but claim that so soon as we leave the rivers they will fall on us for destruction. This certainly does not find corroboration in the fact that they surrendered to forces which marched across the country. Of this sort was the unfinished obstruction of piles about nine miles below here, which the gunboats had to tear away to allow the huge transports to pass through. As nearly as I can learn, Walker has two thousand men, mostly infantry, south of us. Taylor has, perhaps, as many at Alexandria, and it is probable that they may be united at the latter place. Banks has some, doubtless, in his front about Opelousas. The Red River has not been used for large transports or gunboats since May last, being hitherto too low. The Webb, Missouri, Grand Duke, and Mary Keene are at Shreveport, armed. The distances on this river from the Mississippi are: Black River, forty miles; De Russy, seventy miles; Alexandria, one hundred and forty miles; Shreveport, four hundred and fifty miles.
make the estimate that the army around Grand Ecore, under General Banks, on the morning of the Sunday he assumed command, numbered altogether twenty thousand men. With this army he began his march. The country through which he was to move was most disadvantageous for an invading army. The topography of Virginia has been assigned as a reason for every defeat of the army of the Potomac; but Virginia is a garden and a meadow, when compared with the low, flat pine countries that extend from Opelousas, far in the South, to Fort Smith in the North, and cover hundreds of thousands of square miles. There are few plantations and fewer settlements. These are merely built in clearings, of pine logs, thatched and plastered with mud. I have ridden for fifty miles into the heart of this pine country, and from the beginning to the end of the journey there was nothing but a dense, impenetrable, interminable forest, traversed by a few narrow roads, with no sign of life or civilization beyond occa