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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. B. Cushing, Lieutenant, Commanding. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron, etc. Report of Acting-Master H. W. Grinnell. Headquarters Sherman's Army, Fayetteville, N. C., March 12, 1865. Sir — I have the honor to report that I have this day succeeded in handing to Major-General Sherman the cypher dispatch intrusted to me by Major-General Schofield at Wilmington, North Carolina, on the 4th instant. I ral Sherman says: Without wasting time or labor on Branchville or Charleston, which I knew the enemy could no longer hold, I turned all the columns straight on Columbia. From Columbia, after making a feint on Charleston, Sherman advanced to Fayetteville and Goldsborough, while preparations were making by the Federal Generals on the sea-coast to effect a junction with his army--one body of troops to advance from Wilmington, N. C., and the other from Newbern. All the troops that had occupied
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
to desertions, and it afforded an indication of the rapid collapse of the military enthusiasm which had once prevailed in the Southern Confederacy. General Hardee attempted to impede Sherman's march when the latter reached the narrow territory between the Cape Fear and the Black River, but was able to effect very little, retreating as night came on towards Smithfield, N. C. On the 18th, the Federal Army moved on Goldboroa in two columns, the 15th and 17th Corps on the direct road from Fayetteville, and the 14th and 20th Corps on the road from Averyboroa. The former column was supposed by the Confederates to be a day's march in advance of the other, and it was therefore determined to concentrate all their available troops against it on the 19th. Then was fought the battle of Bentonville by the combined forces of Bragg and Hardee, with the object of crippling Sherman before he could effect a junction with Schofield and Terry, and the action was for a time so severe that it looked