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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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unicated to a barrel of explosive matter. It is on an entirely different principle from the machine recently found by one of our vessels floating in the Potomac, and the Richmond secessionists seem to entertain great hopes of its utility in inflicting injuries upon us. At one time, there was a great want of powder in the South, which is now being supplied by manufacturers in North Carolina or Tennessee. The machinery for the manufacture of arms at Harper's Ferry has been removed to Fayetteville, N. C., where two hundred and seventy-five men have been sent to put it into operation. The design is to chiefly manufacture there Morse's breech-loading rifles, for which they have obtained all the necessary patterns. The Tredegar Works at Richmond are very busily engaged manufacturing arms for the rebel army. They turn out two sixty-eight pounders and two six-pound howitzers, or smooth-bore cannon, and a great quantity of shot and shell every week. Mr. Anderson, who is at the head of
y, and the existing war; and then he. asks, Why all this? The answer must be apparent to all. But first, let me supply a chronological table of events on the other side: December 27. The revenue cutter William Aiken surrendered by her commander, and taken possession of by South Carolina. December 28. Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by So
e, buildings, and appurtenances of the arsenal at Little Rock, and the site, buildings, and appurtenances of the hospital at Napoleon, with several conditions annexed, none of which probably affect the use of the property by the Confederate States. This power has not yet been exercised by the delegates commissioned as above stated. On the 5th of June, 1861, North Carolina, by ordinance of the State Convention, ceded to the Confederate States of America jurisdiction over the arsenal at Fayetteville, except that civil process in all cases, and such criminal process as may issue under the authority of the State of North Carolina, against any person or persons charged with crimes committed without said tract of land, may be executed therein, and transferred arsenals, magazines, &c., the title and possession of the lands described, to the Government of the Confederate States. I have not been advised of any decision by the convention of North Carolina in relation to the transfer of arms