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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ed from me only by a shallow river, fordable at many points for infantry as well as cavalry and artillery — no supporting force within eight or ten miles--I supposed that it was not really the intention of the Commanding General to leave me in this position. I was confirmed in my opinion by the answer of Gen. Banks, who advised me to march to Fayetteville, and by the fragmentary paper saying that I would find my pontoon-train at that point. Considering all this, I resolved to march to Fayetteville at night, and made my preparations accordingly, though I did not believe in the correctness of the whole plan. Just at the moment when my troops were about to move, one of my officers returned with an order of Gen. Pope, directing me to march to Warrenton and to encamp there. I put my troops in motion in compliance with this order, and cautiously withdrew from Waterloo Bridge, as I had not a single company of cavalry to cover my retreat. Before withdrawing, however, I ordered the des
ed from me only by a shallow river, fordable at many points for infantry as well as cavalry and artillery — no supporting force within eight or ten miles--I supposed that it was not really the intention of the Commanding General to leave me in this position. I was confirmed in my opinion by the answer of Gen. Banks, who advised me to march to Fayetteville, and by the fragmentary paper saying that I would find my pontoon-train at that point. Considering all this, I resolved to march to Fayetteville at night, and made my preparations accordingly, though I did not believe in the correctness of the whole plan. Just at the moment when my troops were about to move, one of my officers returned with an order of Gen. Pope, directing me to march to Warrenton and to encamp there. I put my troops in motion in compliance with this order, and cautiously withdrew from Waterloo Bridge, as I had not a single company of cavalry to cover my retreat. Before withdrawing, however, I ordered the des